Use of macrophytes for pollution treatment in urban wetlands

Authors: Ellis, J.B., Shutes, R.B., Revitt, D.M. and Zhang, T.

Journal: Resources, Conservation and Recycling

Volume: 11

Pages: 1-12

Publisher: Elsevier

ISSN: 0921-3449

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Authors: Ellis, J.B., Shutes, R.B., Revitt, D.M. and Zhang, T.T.

Journal: Resources, Conservation and Recycling

Volume: 11

Issue: 1-4

Pages: 1-12

ISSN: 0921-3449

DOI: 10.1016/0921-3449(94)90074-4

Heavy metal accumulation by Typha latifolia under both controlled laboratory and in-situ field conditions is reported and interpreted in terms of the possible pollutant removal capacity of this species, when planted in a constructed urban wetland. Greenhouse metal dosing results are also reported for Juncus effusus to provide a comparison in terms of individual tissue uptake. The highest metal concentrations are achieved by Typha root tissue with Cd and Zn demonstrating temporal exponential increases and these metals also showing the highest uptake ability in Juncus root material. The root to stem transfer efficiency for different metals is similar for Juncus and greater than the corresponding root to rhizome and root to leaf movement in Typha. Typha metal tissue level comparisons between the dosing experiment and field study indicate that the uptake limit for Cu, Pb and Zn in both rhizome and leaf is probably achieved at the urban sites. Metal load tissue distributions identify the Typha rhizome as the major metal bioaccumulation area with significantly lower loads occurring in leaf and root tissue, the latter having the lowest overall loadings. The resulting implications for the successful management of Typha when used for the control of metal polluted stormwater inputs are discussed. © 1994.

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