Great British medalists: Psychosocial biographies of Super-Elite and Elite athletes from Olympic sports

Authors: Hardy, L., Barlow, M., Evans, L., Rees, T., Woodman, T. and Warr, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/26874/

Journal: Progress in Brain Research

Volume: 232

Pages: 1-119

Publisher: Progress in Brain Research 232

ISSN: 1875-7855

DOI: 10.1016/bs.pbr.2017.03.004

This source preferred by Tim Rees

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hardy, L., Barlow, M., Evans, L., Rees, T., Woodman, T. and Warr, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/26874/

Journal: Prog Brain Res

Volume: 232

Pages: 1-119

eISSN: 1875-7855

DOI: 10.1016/bs.pbr.2017.03.004

Participants were 32 former GB athletes from Olympic sports, 16 Super-Elite athletes who had won multiple medals at major championships, and 16 matched Elite athletes who had not. In-depth interviews with the athletes, their coaches, and one of their parents explored all psychosocial aspects of their development and careers. Content analyses revealed that there were no differences between Super-Elite and Elite athletes with regard to family values, conscientiousness, or commitment to training. However, the two groups were found to be different with regard to: (1) the experience of a foundational negative life event coupled with a foundational positive sport-related event; (2) the experience of a career turning point that enhanced motivation and focus for their sport; (3) need for success; (4) obsessiveness and/or perfectionism with regard to training and performance; (5) ruthlessness and/or selfishness in the pursuit of their sporting goals; (6) dual focus on both mastery and outcome; (7) the use of counterphobic attitudes and/or total preparation to maintain higher levels of performance under pressure; and (8) the relative importance of sport over other aspects of life. The results are discussed within the context of psychodynamic theory, and recommendations are made for both applied implications and future research.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hardy, L., Barlow, M., Evans, L., Rees, T., Woodman, T. and Warr, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/26874/

Volume: 232

Pages: 1-119

eISSN: 1875-7855

ISSN: 0079-6123

DOI: 10.1016/bs.pbr.2017.03.004

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Participants were 32 former GB athletes from Olympic sports, 16 Super-Elite athletes who had won multiple medals at major championships, and 16 matched Elite athletes who had not. In-depth interviews with the athletes, their coaches, and one of their parents explored all psychosocial aspects of their development and careers. Content analyses revealed that there were no differences between Super-Elite and Elite athletes with regard to family values, conscientiousness, or commitment to training. However, the two groups were found to be different with regard to: (1) the experience of a foundational negative life event coupled with a foundational positive sport-related event; (2) the experience of a career turning point that enhanced motivation and focus for their sport; (3) need for success; (4) obsessiveness and/or perfectionism with regard to training and performance; (5) ruthlessness and/or selfishness in the pursuit of their sporting goals; (6) dual focus on both mastery and outcome; (7) the use of counterphobic attitudes and/or total preparation to maintain higher levels of performance under pressure; and (8) the relative importance of sport over other aspects of life. The results are discussed within the context of psychodynamic theory, and recommendations are made for both applied implications and future research.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Hardy, L., Barlow, M., Evans, L., Rees, T., Woodman, T. and Warr, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/26874/

Journal: SPORT AND THE BRAIN: THE SCIENCE OF PREPARING, ENDURING AND WINNING, PT A

Volume: 232

Pages: 1-119

ISSN: 0079-6123

DOI: 10.1016/bs.pbr.2017.03.004

The data on this page was last updated at 05:19 on April 6, 2020.