Type A behaviour and consumption of an atherogenic diet: No association in the PRIME study

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Appleton, K.M. et al.

Journal: Appetite

Volume: 49

Issue: 3

Pages: 554-560

ISSN: 0195-6663

DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2007.03.223

It has previously been suggested that the association between Type A behaviour and coronary heart disease (CHD) may be mediated through diet. This analysis investigates associations between Type A behaviour and diet, with particular focus on foods high in saturated fats and cholesterol (cake, cheese, eggs and fried potatoes), foods high in unsaturated fats (fish and nuts), and fruit and vegetables. The analysis was conducted on data collected from 10,602 men from Northern Ireland and France screened for inclusion in the PRIME cohort study. Type A behaviour was measured using the Framingham Type A Behaviour Patterns Questionnaire, diet was measured using a Food Frequency Questionnaire and various demographic details were also assessed. Levels of Type A behaviour and intakes of all food groups were similar to previous studies. Using regression, Type A behaviour was significantly associated with diet, and specifically with a higher consumption of cheese and vegetables in Northern Ireland, and a higher consumption of cake, fish and vegetables in France. These associations are most plausibly explained as a result of lifestyle, although the possibility of independent associations between Type A behaviour and diet remains. The work is limited by the use of questionnaires, but the findings available suggest that Type A behaviour is unlikely to be associated with the consumption of a diet that has previously been linked to CHD. These findings suggest that any association between Type A behaviour and CHD is unlikely to be mediated through diet.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Appleton, K.M. et al.

Journal: Appetite

Volume: 49

Issue: 3

Pages: 554-560

eISSN: 1095-8304

ISSN: 0195-6663

DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2007.03.223

It has previously been suggested that the association between Type A behaviour and coronary heart disease (CHD) may be mediated through diet. This analysis investigates associations between Type A behaviour and diet, with particular focus on foods high in saturated fats and cholesterol (cake, cheese, eggs and fried potatoes), foods high in unsaturated fats (fish and nuts), and fruit and vegetables. The analysis was conducted on data collected from 10,602 men from Northern Ireland and France screened for inclusion in the PRIME cohort study. Type A behaviour was measured using the Framingham Type A Behaviour Patterns Questionnaire, diet was measured using a Food Frequency Questionnaire and various demographic details were also assessed. Levels of Type A behaviour and intakes of all food groups were similar to previous studies. Using regression, Type A behaviour was significantly associated with diet, and specifically with a higher consumption of cheese and vegetables in Northern Ireland, and a higher consumption of cake, fish and vegetables in France. These associations are most plausibly explained as a result of lifestyle, although the possibility of independent associations between Type A behaviour and diet remains. The work is limited by the use of questionnaires, but the findings available suggest that Type A behaviour is unlikely to be associated with the consumption of a diet that has previously been linked to CHD. These findings suggest that any association between Type A behaviour and CHD is unlikely to be mediated through diet. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Appleton, K.M. et al.

Journal: APPETITE

Volume: 49

Issue: 3

Pages: 554-560

ISSN: 0195-6663

DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2007.03.223

The data on this page was last updated at 04:56 on March 22, 2019.