Socio-economic drivers of specialist anglers targeting the non-native European catfish (Silurus glanis) in the UK

Authors: Rees, A., Britton, J., Davies, G.D., Edmonds-Brown, V., Wright, R., Alam, F. and Cowx, I.G.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29441/

Journal: PLoS ONE

Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)

ISSN: 1932-6203

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Rees, E.M.A., Edmonds-Brown, V.R., Alam, M.F., Wright, R.M., Britton, J.R., Davies, G.D. and Cowx, I.G.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29441/

Journal: PLoS One

Volume: 12

Issue: 6

Pages: e0178805

eISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0178805

Information about the socioeconomic drivers of Silurus glanis anglers in the UK were collected using questionnaires from a cross section of mixed cyprinid fisheries to elucidate human dimensions in angling and non-native fisheries management. Respondents were predominantly male (95%), 30-40 years of age with <10 yr angling experience for S. glanis; most had received college rather than university education. The majority (34%) were employed with low-moderate income status (<£30k per annum), which may restrict time and expenditure spent on angling. Highest angling expenditure was on equipment and bait with most from southern England (54%) spending >£500 per annum. The proportion of time spent angling for S. glanis was significantly related to angler motivations; fish size, challenge in catch, tranquil natural surroundings, escape from daily stress and to be alone were considered important drivers of increased time spent angling. Overall, poor awareness of: the risks and adverse ecological impacts associated with introduced S. glanis, non-native fisheries legislation, problems in use of unlimited ground bait and high fish stocking rates in angling lakes were evident, possibly related to inadequate training and information provided by angling organisations to anglers, as many stated that they were insufficiently informed.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Rees, E.M.A., Edmonds-Brown, V.R., Alam, M.F., Wright, R.M., Britton, J.R., Davies, G.D. and Cowx, I.G.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29441/

Journal: PLoS ONE

Volume: 12

Issue: 6

eISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0178805

© 2017 Rees et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Information about the socioeconomic drivers of Silurus glanis anglers in the UK were collected using questionnaires from a cross section of mixed cyprinid fisheries to elucidate human dimensions in angling and non-native fisheries management. Respondents were predominantly male (95%), 30-40 years of age with <10 yr angling experience for S. glanis; most had received college rather than university education. The majority (34%) were employed with low-moderate income status (<£30k per annum), which may restrict time and expenditure spent on angling. Highest angling expenditure was on equipment and bait with most from southern England (54%) spending >£500 per annum. The proportion of time spent angling for S. glanis was significantly related to angler motivations; fish size, challenge in catch, tranquil natural surroundings, escape from daily stress and to be alone were considered important drivers of increased time spent angling. Overall, poor awareness of: the risks and adverse ecological impacts associated with introduced S. glanis, non-native fisheries legislation, problems in use of unlimited ground bait and high fish stocking rates in angling lakes were evident, possibly related to inadequate training and information provided by angling organisations to anglers, as many stated that they were insufficiently informed.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Rees, E.M.A., Edmonds-Brown, V.R., Alam, M.F., Wright, R.M., Britton, J.R., Davies, G.D. and Cowx, I.G.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29441/

Journal: PLOS ONE

Volume: 12

Issue: 6

ISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0178805

The data on this page was last updated at 05:01 on July 17, 2019.