Challenging nurse student selection policy: Using a lifeworld approach to explore the link between care experience and student values

Authors: Scammell, J., Tait, D., White, S. and Tait, M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29489/

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)2054-1058

Journal: Nursing Open

Pages: 1-12

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

ISSN: 2054-1058

DOI: 10.1002/nop2.88

Aim: This study uses a lifeworld perspective to explore beginning students’ values about nursing. Internationally, increasing care demand, a focus on targets and evidence of dehumanized care cultures have resulted in scrutiny of practitioner values. In England, selection policy dictates that prospective nursing students demonstrate person-centred values and care work experience. However, there is limited recent evidence exploring values at programme commencement or the effect of care experience on values.

Design: Mixed method study.

Methods: A total of 161 undergraduate nursing students were recruited in 2013 from one English university. Thematic content analysis and frequency distribution to reveal descriptive statistics were used.

Results: Statistical analysis indicated that most of the values identified in student responses were not significantly affected by paid care experience. Five themes were identified: How I want care to be; Making a difference; The value of learning; Perceived characteristics of a nurse; and Respecting our humanity. Students readily drew on their experience of living to identify person-centred values about nursing.

Authors: Scammell, J., Tait, D., White, S. and Tait, M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29489/

Journal: Nursing Open

Publisher: Wiley

Aim: This study uses a lifeworld perspective to explore beginning students’ values about nursing. Internationally, increasing care demand, a focus on targets and evidence of dehumanised care cultures has resulted in scrutiny of practitioner values. In England, selection policy dictates that prospective nursing students demonstrate person-centred values and care work experience. However there is limited recent evidence exploring values at programme commencement or the effect of care experience on values. Design: Mixed method study.

Methods: 161 undergraduate nursing students were recruited in 2013 from one English university. Thematic content analysis and frequency distribution to reveal descriptive statistics was used. Results: Statistical analysis indicated that most of the values identified in student responses were not significantly affected by paid care experience. Five themes were identified: How I want care to be; Making a difference; The value of learning; Perceived characteristics of a nurse; Respecting our humanity. Students readily drew upon their experience of living to identify person-centred values about nursing.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Scammell, J., Tait, D., White, S. and Tait, M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29489/

Journal: Nurs Open

Volume: 4

Issue: 4

Pages: 218-229

ISSN: 2054-1058

DOI: 10.1002/nop2.88

AIM: This study uses a lifeworld perspective to explore beginning students' values about nursing. Internationally, increasing care demand, a focus on targets and evidence of dehumanized care cultures have resulted in scrutiny of practitioner values. In England, selection policy dictates that prospective nursing students demonstrate person-centred values and care work experience. However, there is limited recent evidence exploring values at programme commencement or the effect of care experience on values. DESIGN: Mixed method study. METHODS: A total of 161 undergraduate nursing students were recruited in 2013 from one English university. Thematic content analysis and frequency distribution to reveal descriptive statistics were used. RESULTS: Statistical analysis indicated that most of the values identified in student responses were not significantly affected by paid care experience. Five themes were identified: How I want care to be; Making a difference; The value of learning; Perceived characteristics of a nurse; and Respecting our humanity. Students readily drew on their experience of living to identify person-centred values about nursing.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Scammell, J., Tait, D., White, S. and Tait, M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29489/

Journal: Nursing Open

Volume: 4

Issue: 4

Pages: 218-229

eISSN: 2054-1058

DOI: 10.1002/nop2.88

© 2017 The Authors. Nursing Open published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Aim: This study uses a lifeworld perspective to explore beginning students’ values about nursing. Internationally, increasing care demand, a focus on targets and evidence of dehumanized care cultures have resulted in scrutiny of practitioner values. In England, selection policy dictates that prospective nursing students demonstrate person-centred values and care work experience. However, there is limited recent evidence exploring values at programme commencement or the effect of care experience on values. Design: Mixed method study. Methods: A total of 161 undergraduate nursing students were recruited in 2013 from one English university. Thematic content analysis and frequency distribution to reveal descriptive statistics were used. Results: Statistical analysis indicated that most of the values identified in student responses were not significantly affected by paid care experience. Five themes were identified: How I want care to be; Making a difference; The value of learning; Perceived characteristics of a nurse; and Respecting our humanity. Students readily drew on their experience of living to identify person-centred values about nursing.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Scammell, J., Tait, D., White, S. and Tait, M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29489/

Journal: NURSING OPEN

Volume: 4

Issue: 4

Pages: 218-229

ISSN: 2054-1058

DOI: 10.1002/nop2.88

The data on this page was last updated at 04:57 on May 24, 2019.