Real world challenges in delivering person-centred care: A community-based case study

Authors: Riding, S., Glendening, N. and Heaslip, V.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29516/

Journal: British journal of community nursing

Volume: 22

Issue: 8

Pages: 248-251

Publisher: Mark Allen Publishing Ltd.

ISSN: 1462-4753

Case study reflecting on the complexity and salience of delivering person centred care in the primary care setting.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Riding, S., Glendening, N. and Heaslip, V.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29516/

Journal: Br J Community Nurs

Volume: 22

Issue: 8

Pages: 391-396

ISSN: 1462-4753

DOI: 10.12968/bjcn.2017.22.8.391

Community nurses face many challenges when trying to practice evidence-based, person-centred care. Ongoing concerns regarding the impact of the 2013 Francis Report ( Ford and Lintern, 2017 ) suggest that individualised and holistic care is an impossible dream, one made harder when the client appears uncooperative. This paper presents a case study that sets out how some of these challenges were met in a potentially difficult situation experienced by a student nurse and her mentor in practice, in which the student was supported to further examine and explore issues that may have influenced the situation. In this instance, the solution came with the recognition that the client had expertise and knowledge that needed to be taken into account, alongside that of the nurses looking after him. His care became a partnership, not an imposition of expertise; a principle which is transferable to many other situations. Underpinning it was the recognition of our shared humanity, wherein lies the essence of truly holistic care, and student nurses learning this, through the guidance and support of their mentor.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Riding, S., Glendening, N. and Heaslip, V.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29516/

Journal: British Journal of Community Nursing

Volume: 22

Issue: 8

Pages: 391-396

ISSN: 1462-4753

DOI: 10.12968/bjcn.2017.22.8.391

© MA Healthcare Ltd. All rights reserved. Community nurses face many challenges when trying to practice evidence-based, person-centred care. Ongoing concerns regarding the impact of the 2013 Francis Report (Ford and Lintern, 2017) suggest that individualised and holistic care is an impossible dream, one made harder when the client appears uncooperative. This paper presents a case study that sets out how some of these challenges were met in a potentially difficult situation experienced by a student nurse and her mentor in practice, in which the student was supported to further examine and explore issues that may have influenced the situation. In this instance, the solution came with the recognition that the client had expertise and knowledge that needed to be taken into account, alongside that of the nurses looking after him. His care became a partnership, not an imposition of expertise; a principle which is transferable to many other situations. Underpinning it was the recognition of our shared humanity, wherein lies the essence of truly holistic care, and student nurses learning this, through the guidance and support of their mentor.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:30 on November 25, 2020.