Item-specific proactive interference in olfactory working memory

This source preferred by Andrew Johnson

Authors: Moss, A., Miles, C., Elsley and Johnson, A.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29719/

Journal: Memory

Volume: 26

Issue: 4

Pages: 468-482

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISSN: 0965-8211

DOI: 10.1080/09658211.2017.1369546

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Moss, A., Miles, C., Elsley, J. and Johnson, A.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29719/

Journal: Memory

Volume: 26

Issue: 4

Pages: 468-482

eISSN: 1464-0686

DOI: 10.1080/09658211.2017.1369546

We examine item-specific olfactory proactive interference (PI) effects and undertake comparisons with verbal and non-verbal visual stimuli. Using a sequential recent-probes task, we show no evidence for PI with hard-to-name odours (Experiment 1). However, verbalisable odours do exhibit PI effects (Experiment 2). These findings occur despite above chance performance and similar serial position functions across both tasks. Experiments 3 and 4 apply words and faces, respectively, to our modified procedure, and show that methodological differences cannot explain the null finding in Experiment 1. The extent to which odours exhibit analogous PI effects to that of other modalities is, we argue, contingent on the characteristics of the odours employed.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Moss, A., Miles, C., Elsley, J. and Johnson, A.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29719/

Journal: Memory

Volume: 26

Issue: 4

Pages: 468-482

eISSN: 1464-0686

ISSN: 0965-8211

DOI: 10.1080/09658211.2017.1369546

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. We examine item-specific olfactory proactive interference (PI) effects and undertake comparisons with verbal and non-verbal visual stimuli. Using a sequential recent-probes task, we show no evidence for PI with hard-to-name odours (Experiment 1). However, verbalisable odours do exhibit PI effects (Experiment 2). These findings occur despite above chance performance and similar serial position functions across both tasks. Experiments 3 and 4 apply words and faces, respectively, to our modified procedure, and show that methodological differences cannot explain the null finding in Experiment 1. The extent to which odours exhibit analogous PI effects to that of other modalities is, we argue, contingent on the characteristics of the odours employed.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Moss, A., Miles, C., Elsley, J. and Johnson, A.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29719/

Journal: MEMORY

Volume: 26

Issue: 4

Pages: 468-482

eISSN: 1464-0686

ISSN: 0965-8211

DOI: 10.1080/09658211.2017.1369546

The data on this page was last updated at 05:25 on October 26, 2020.