Defining sustainable transport in rural tourism: experiences from the New Forest

Authors: Dickinson, J., Smith, A. and Robbins, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30009/

Journal: Journal of Sustainable Tourism

Publisher: Channel View Publications

ISSN: 0966-9582

DOI: 10.1080/09669582.2017.1401633

Transport policy agendas have long sought to bring about more sustainable transport at tourism destinations. While there are examples of successes, it remains unclear what inroads have been made towards creating a sustainable transport future. Policy directions have evolved over a number of years and in many tourism destination contexts it is far from clear what a desirable transport future looks like. When translated to implementation, the aims of initiatives can be unclear and baseline measures inconsistent, making success difficult to judge. This paper analyses how sustainable travel has been implemented in practice at a destination level. The focus is rural tourism and data are derived from a specific case, the New Forest National Park, UK, where a wide range of transport initiatives have been implemented since the Park’s designation in 2005. The study adopts a social practice theory perspective. Data are derived from a visitor survey, interviews and observations. It finds there is scope to improve sustainable transport provision at destinations through understanding visitor practices, but limited scope to influence meanings associated with visitor travel and travel skills. Policy meets the needs of some visitors more than others.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Smith, A., Robbins, D. and Dickinson, J.E.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30009/

Journal: Journal of Sustainable Tourism

Volume: 27

Issue: 2

Pages: 258-275

eISSN: 1747-7646

ISSN: 0966-9582

DOI: 10.1080/09669582.2017.1401633

© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Transport policy agendas have long sought to bring about more sustainable transport at tourism destinations. Whilst there are examples of successes, it remains unclear what inroads have been made towards creating a sustainable transport future. Policy directions have evolved over a number of years and in many tourism destination contexts, it is far from clear what a desirable transport future looks like. When translated to implementation, the aims of initiatives can be unclear and baseline measures inconsistent, making success difficult to judge. This paper analyses how sustainable travel has been implemented in practice at a destination level. The focus is rural tourism and data are derived from a specific case, the New Forest National Park, UK, where a wide range of transport initiatives have been implemented since the Park's designation in 2005. The study adopts a social practice theory perspective. Data are derived from a visitor survey, interviews and observations. It finds there is scope to improve sustainable transport provision at destinations through understanding visitor practices, but limited scope to influence meanings associated with visitor travel and travel skills. Policy meets the needs of some visitors more than others.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Smith, A., Robbins, D. and Dickinson, J.E.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30009/

Journal: JOURNAL OF SUSTAINABLE TOURISM

Volume: 27

Issue: 2

Pages: 258-275

eISSN: 1747-7646

ISSN: 0966-9582

DOI: 10.1080/09669582.2017.1401633

The data on this page was last updated at 05:09 on February 20, 2020.