Influence of alcohol containing and alcohol free cosmetics on FAEE concentrations in hair. A performance evaluation of ethyl palmitate as sole marker, versus the sum of four FAEEs

Authors: Paul, R., Dumitrascu, C., Kingston, R. and Williams, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30079/

Journal: Forensic science international

Publisher: Elsevier BV

ISSN: 0379-0738

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Dumitrascu, C., Paul, R., Kingston, R. and Williams, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30079/

Journal: Forensic Sci Int

Volume: 283

Pages: 29-34

eISSN: 1872-6283

DOI: 10.1016/j.forsciint.2017.12.002

Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) are direct metabolites of ethanol and have been shown to be suitable markers for the evaluation of alcohol consumption. Previous research has suggested that the regular use of alcohol containing cosmetic products can influence the concentration of FAEE detected in hair. In this study we investigated the influence of alcohol containing and alcohol free hair cosmetics (hairspray and waxes) on the FAEE concentrations in hair. The effect of cosmetic treatment was measured against the impact on ethyl palmitate in isolation as compared to the sum of four esters. 10 volunteers treated part of their scalp with cosmetic products every day during a 2 month period (alcohol free hairspray n=2, hairspray containing alcohol (42% by volume) n=3, alcohol free wax n=2, wax containing alcohol (11% by volume) n=3). After the 2 month period of cosmetic application hair samples from volunteers were collected from both sides of the scalp. Hair samples were washed with n-heptane, and then cut finely into small pieces. All samples were subjected to clean-up by HS-SPME and then GC PCI-MS/MS for analysis of FAEEs. Comparison of FAEE concentrations between treated and untreated hair showed in some instances that application of hair spray or wax products caused an increase in FAEE levels. Products containing alcohol caused a more substantial increase in alcohol metabolite concentrations in hair when compared to alcohol free products. Three volunteers using an alcohol based hairspray in the study experienced a significant increase in FAEE levels (+27.4%, +205.5%, and +1287.5%), with one of the volunteers showing levels below the cut off for 'abstinence' in the untreated scalp portion, and levels above the cut off for 'chronic excessive consumption' in the treated scalp portion. Performance evaluation of ethyl palmitate as sole marker, compared to the sum of four esters approach suggested that the two quantification approaches react in a very similar manner to the application of hair sprays and waxes. We would suggest that the interpretative value of FAEE hair measurements from people reporting the use of alcohol based hairsprays are treated with caution.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Dumitrascu, C., Paul, R., Kingston, R. and Williams, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30079/

Journal: Forensic Science International

Volume: 283

Pages: 29-34

eISSN: 1872-6283

ISSN: 0379-0738

DOI: 10.1016/j.forsciint.2017.12.002

© 2017 Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) are direct metabolites of ethanol and have been shown to be suitable markers for the evaluation of alcohol consumption. Previous research has suggested that the regular use of alcohol containing cosmetic products can influence the concentration of FAEE detected in hair. In this study we investigated the influence of alcohol containing and alcohol free hair cosmetics (hairspray and waxes) on the FAEE concentrations in hair. The effect of cosmetic treatment was measured against the impact on ethyl palmitate in isolation as compared to the sum of four esters. 10 volunteers treated part of their scalp with cosmetic products every day during a 2 month period (alcohol free hairspray n = 2, hairspray containing alcohol (42% by volume) n = 3, alcohol free wax n = 2, wax containing alcohol (11% by volume) n = 3). After the 2 month period of cosmetic application hair samples from volunteers were collected from both sides of the scalp. Hair samples were washed with n-heptane, and then cut finely into small pieces. All samples were subjected to clean-up by HS-SPME and then GC PCI-MS/MS for analysis of FAEEs. Comparison of FAEE concentrations between treated and untreated hair showed in some instances that application of hair spray or wax products caused an increase in FAEE levels. Products containing alcohol caused a more substantial increase in alcohol metabolite concentrations in hair when compared to alcohol free products. Three volunteers using an alcohol based hairspray in the study experienced a significant increase in FAEE levels (+27.4%, +205.5%, and +1287.5%), with one of the volunteers showing levels below the cut off for ‘abstinence’ in the untreated scalp portion, and levels above the cut off for ‘chronic excessive consumption’ in the treated scalp portion. Performance evaluation of ethyl palmitate as sole marker, compared to the sum of four esters approach suggested that the two quantification approaches react in a very similar manner to the application of hair sprays and waxes. We would suggest that the interpretative value of FAEE hair measurements from people reporting the use of alcohol based hairsprays are treated with caution.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Dumitrascu, C., Paul, R., Kingston, R. and Williams, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30079/

Journal: FORENSIC SCIENCE INTERNATIONAL

Volume: 283

Pages: 29-34

eISSN: 1872-6283

ISSN: 0379-0738

DOI: 10.1016/j.forsciint.2017.12.002

The data on this page was last updated at 05:13 on February 22, 2020.