A Novel Approach to Overcome Movement Artifact When Using a Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging System for Alternating Speeds of Blood Microcirculation

This source preferred by Tom Wainwright

Authors: Bahadori, S., Immins, T. and Wainwright, T.W.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30108/

Journal: JOVE-JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS

Issue: 126

ISSN: 1940-087X

DOI: 10.3791/56415

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Bahadori, S., Immins, T. and Wainwright, T.W.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30108/

Journal: J Vis Exp

Issue: 126

eISSN: 1940-087X

DOI: 10.3791/56415

The laser speckle contrast imager (LSCI) provides a powerful yet simple technique for measuring microcirculatory blood flow. Ideal for blood dynamic responses, the LSCI is used in the same way as a conventional Laser Doppler Imager (LDI). However, with a maximum skin depth of approximately 1 mm, the LSCI is designed to focus on mainly superficial blood flow. It is used to measure skin surface areas of up to 15 cm x 20 cm. The new technique introduced in this paper accounts for alternating speeds of microcirculations; i.e. both slow and fast flow flux measurement using the LSCI. The novel technique also overcomes LSCI's biggest shortcoming, which is high sensitivity to artifact movement. An adhesive opaque patch (AOP) is introduced for satisfactory recording of microcirculatory blood flow, by subtracting the LSCI signal from the AOP from the laser speckle skin signal. The optimal setting is also defined because the LSCI is most powerful when flux changes are measured relative to a reference baseline, with blood microcirculatory flux expressed as a percentage change from the baseline. These changes may be used for analyzing the status of the blood flow system.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Bahadori, S., Immins, T. and Wainwright, T.W.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30108/

Journal: Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE

Issue: 126

eISSN: 1940-087X

DOI: 10.3791/56415

The laser speckle contrast imager (LSCI) provides a powerful yet simple technique for measuring microcirculatory blood flow. Ideal for blood dynamic responses, the LSCI is used in the same way as a conventional Laser Doppler Imager (LDI). However, with a maximum skin depth of approximately 1 mm, the LSCI is designed to focus on mainly superficial blood flow. It is used to measure skin surface areas of up to 15 cm x 20 cm. The new technique introduced in this paper accounts for alternating speeds of microcirculations; i.e. both slow and fast flow flux measurement using the LSCI. The novel technique also overcomes LSCI's biggest shortcoming, which is high sensitivity to artifact movement. An adhesive opaque patch (AOP) is introduced for satisfactory recording of microcirculatory blood flow, by subtracting the LSCI signal from the AOP from the laser speckle skin signal. The optimal setting is also defined because the LSCI is most powerful when flux changes are measured relative to a reference baseline, with blood microcirculatory flux expressed as a percentage change from the baseline. These changes may be used for analyzing the status of the blood flow system.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Bahadori, S., Immins, T. and Wainwright, T.W.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30108/

Journal: JOVE-JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS

Issue: 126

ISSN: 1940-087X

DOI: 10.3791/56415

The data on this page was last updated at 04:57 on May 21, 2019.