Lifestyle coaching for mental health difficulties: scoping review

Authors: Bishop, L., Hemingway, A. and Ashencaen Crabtree, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30560/

Journal: Journal of Public Mental Health

Publisher: Pavilion

ISSN: 2042-8731

Purpose: UK mental health strategy calls for interventions that empower people to selfmanage their condition. In lifestyle coaching, coach and client work collaboratively on positive behaviour change to improve client health. There is debate about the appropriateness of coaching for mental health, yet claims have not been supported with evidence. Therefore, this study sought to explore the nature and scope of existing research literature in this field.

Design/methodology/approach: Scoping review.

Findings: The growing evidence-base shows positive outcomes of coaching; for instance symptom reduction, enhanced self-management and achievement of personal goals.

Research limitations/implications: The evidence-base is small and of variable quality, offering insights that warrant further exploration.

Practical implications: Coaching not only supports better self-management but also addresses further mental health strategy priorities (such as improved physical health and social functioning). Coaches need not be mental health experts; therefore coaching may be a cost-effective intervention.

Social implications: As mental ill-health prevalence continues to rise despite widespread use of IAPT and medication, there is a need to explore how novel approaches such as coaching might be integrated into mental healthcare.

Originality/value: This was the first study to collate the evidence on mental health coaching, highlighting its extensive potential, which should be further explored in research and practice

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Bishop, L., Hemingway, A. and Crabtree, S.A.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30560/

Journal: Journal of Public Mental Health

Volume: 17

Issue: 1

Pages: 29-44

eISSN: 2042-8731

ISSN: 1746-5729

DOI: 10.1108/JPMH-04-2017-0018

© 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: UK mental health strategy calls for interventions that empower people to self-manage their condition. In lifestyle coaching, coach and client work collaboratively on positive behaviour change to improve client health. There is debate about the appropriateness of coaching for mental health, yet claims have not been supported with evidence. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to explore the nature and scope of the existing research literature in this field. Design/methodology/approach: Scoping review. Findings: The growing evidence base shows positive outcomes of coaching; for instance, symptom reduction, enhanced self-management and achievement of personal goals. Research limitations/implications: The evidence base is small and of variable quality, offering insights that warrant further exploration. Practical implications: Coaching not only supports better self-management but also addresses further mental health strategy priorities (such as improved physical health and social functioning). Coaches need not be mental health experts; therefore coaching may be a cost-effective intervention. Social implications: As mental ill-health prevalence continues to rise despite widespread use of Improving Access to Psychological Therapies and medication, there is a need to explore how novel approaches such as coaching might be integrated into mental healthcare. Originality/value: This is the first study to collate the evidence on mental health coaching, highlighting its extensive potential, which should be further explored in research and practice.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:16 on April 4, 2020.