A dual geochemical-phytolith methodology for studying activity areas in ephemeral sites: Insights from an ethnographic case study from Jordan

Authors: Vos, D., Jenkins, E. and Palmer, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30872/

Journal: Geoarchaeology

ISSN: 0883-6353

DOI: 10.1002/gea.21685

This study aims to contribute to the interpretation of ephemeral sites by exploring the efficacy of geochemistry and phytolith analysis to identify activity areas in seasonally occupied ethnographic sites. The application of a portable X ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument and phytolith analysis to soil samples from six Bedouin campsites at Wadi Faynan, Jordan, provided insights about anthropogenic enrichment patterns and the effects of short periods of abandonment on these. The compatibility of the two analysis techniques and means to combine the results of both are addressed. The results of this study suggest that soil signatures can be found in ephemeral sites following abandonment, even in dynamic and harsh environments. The efficacy of the geochemical analysis to indicate variance within the data was found to be greater than that of the phytolith analysis in these case studies, while certain trends within the phytolith results were more useful in identifying specific activities. Due to the compatibility of the geochemical and phytolith data, it is proposed that a serial or parallel approach should be taken for their statistical analysis.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Vos, D., Jenkins, E. and Palmer, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30872/

Journal: Geoarchaeology

Volume: 33

Issue: 6

Pages: 680-694

eISSN: 1520-6548

ISSN: 0883-6353

DOI: 10.1002/gea.21685

© 2018 The Authors Geoarchaeology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This study aims to contribute to the interpretation of ephemeral sites by exploring the efficacy of geochemistry and phytolith analysis to identify activity areas in seasonally occupied ethnographic sites. The application of a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument and phytolith analysis to soil samples from six Bedouin campsites at Wadi Faynan, Jordan, provided insights about anthropogenic enrichment patterns and the effects of short periods of abandonment on these. The compatibility of the two analysis techniques and means to combine the results of both are addressed. The results of this study suggest that soil signatures can be found in ephemeral sites following abandonment, even in dynamic and harsh environments. The efficacy of the geochemical analysis to indicate variance within the data was found to be greater than that of the phytolith analysis in these case studies, while certain trends within the phytolith results were more useful in identifying specific activities. Due to the compatibility of the geochemical and phytolith data, it is proposed that a serial or parallel approach should be taken for their statistical analysis.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Vos, D., Jenkins, E. and Palmer, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30872/

Journal: GEOARCHAEOLOGY-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL

Volume: 33

Issue: 6

Pages: 680-694

eISSN: 1520-6548

ISSN: 0883-6353

DOI: 10.1002/gea.21685

The data on this page was last updated at 05:12 on February 26, 2020.