Facing up to Constantine: Reassessing the Stonegate monumental head from York

Authors: Russell, M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31480/

Journal: Britannia

Volume: 49

Pages: 1-14

Publisher: Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies

ISSN: 0068-113X

DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X18000090

A damaged and badly weathered stone head, discovered prior to 1823 in York, and interpreted as an early portrait of the emperor Constantine I, is here re-examined and identified as a modified image of an earlier, deified emperor, almost certainly Hadrian. A re-analysis of the image as it survives today further suggests that the recarving, into a likeness of Constantine, occurred after A.D. 312 and not, as widely believed, at the moment of Constantine’s proclamation as emperor in York in A.D. 306

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Authors: Russell, M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31480/

Journal: Britannia

Volume: 49

Pages: 211-224

eISSN: 1753-5352

ISSN: 0068-113X

DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X18000090

© The Author(s) 2018. Published by The Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies.. A damaged and badly weathered stone head, discovered prior to 1823 in York, and interpreted as an early portrait of the emperor Constantine I, is here re-examined and identified as a modified image of an earlier, deified emperor, almost certainly Hadrian. A re-analysis of the image as it survives today further suggests that the recarving, into a likeness of Constantine, occurred after A.D. 312 and not, as widely believed, at the moment of Constantine's proclamation as emperor in York in A.D. 306.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Russell, M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31480/

Journal: BRITANNIA

Volume: 49

Pages: 211-224

eISSN: 1753-5352

ISSN: 0068-113X

DOI: 10.1017/S0068113X18000090

The data on this page was last updated at 05:24 on January 23, 2021.