Addressing prescription discrepancies in renal patients: A prospective audit

Authors: Lam, S., Docherty, S. and Taylor, J.E.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30538/

Journal: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

Volume: 48

Issue: 1

Pages: 16-19

Publisher: Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

ISSN: 1478-2715

DOI: 10.4997/JRCPE.2018.103

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Lam, S., Docherty, S. and Taylor, J.E.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30538/

Journal: J R Coll Physicians Edinb

Volume: 48

Issue: 1

Pages: 16-19

eISSN: 2042-8189

DOI: 10.4997/JRCPE.2018.103

Background Management of chronic renal failure requires complex medication regimens to manage hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, phosphate, anaemia and acidosis. Patient engagement in medicine management is essential to avoid potential harm. Methods We prospectively audited the rate of discrepancies between our hospital record of patient medications and their current prescription. We investigated whether changes to appointment letters reduced the number of discrepancies. Results The proportion of patients attending renal outpatient clinics failing to bring a list or unable to recall their medications fell over a 3-year period following changes to appointment letters (median proportion: 0.45 in 2014, 0.36 in 2015, 0.30 in 2016, Chi-sq = 46.94, p < 0.001); percentage of patients forgetting to bring a list with significant prescription discrepancies fell from 10.9% in 2014 to 3.9% in 2016). Conclusion Changes to appointment letters can potentially improve prescribing safety in an outpatient setting.

This source preferred by Sharon Docherty

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Lam, S., Docherty, S. and Taylor, J.E.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30538/

Journal: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

Volume: 48

Issue: 1

Pages: 16-19

ISSN: 1478-2715

DOI: 10.4997/JRCPE.2018.103

© 2018, Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh. All rights reserved. Background Management of chronic renal failure requires complex medication regimens to manage hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, phosphate, anaemia and acidosis. Patient engagement in medicine management is essential to avoid potential harm. Methods We prospectively audited the rate of discrepancies between our hospital record of patient medications and their current prescription. We investigated whether changes to appointment letters reduced the number of discrepancies. Results The proportion of patients attending renal outpatient clinics failing to bring a list or unable to recall their medications fell over a 3-year period following changes to appointment letters (median proportion: 0.45 in 2014, 0.36 in 2015, 0.30 in 2016, Chi-sq = 46.94, p < 0.001); percentage of patients forgetting to bring a list with significant prescription discrepancies fell from 10.9% in 2014 to 3.9% in 2016). Conclusion Changes to appointment letters can potentially improve prescribing safety in an outpatient setting.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Lam, S., Docherty, S. and Taylor, J.E.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30538/

Journal: JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS OF EDINBURGH

Volume: 48

Issue: 1

Pages: 16-19

eISSN: 2042-8189

ISSN: 1478-2715

DOI: 10.4997/JRCPE.2018.103

The data on this page was last updated at 05:17 on May 25, 2020.