High-normal blood glucose levels may be associated with decreased spatial perception in young healthy adults

Authors: Razzak, R.A., Alshaiji, A.F., Qareeballa, A.A., Mohamed, M.W., Bagust, J. and Docherty, S.

Journal: PLoS ONE

Volume: 13

Issue: 6

eISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0199051

Abstract:

The negative effects of high normal glucose on cognitive function were previously reported in euglycemic individuals of middle age and the elderly population. This study aimed at examining the effect of baseline blood glucose levels on spatial ability, specifically verticality perception on the computerized rod and frame test (CRFT) in young healthy adults. 63 healthy male medical students (age range from 18–23 years), of whom 30 were non-fasting outside the month of Ramadan and 33 fasting during Ramadan of the year 2016, were recruited in order to create varying degrees of glycemia during which verticality perception was carried out. Baseline blood glucose reading was obtained prior to commencing the CRFT test. Blood glucose levels at the time of testing decreased as the duration between the last meal and testing increased. A blood glucose range of 62–117 mg/dl was achieved among participants for this study. Linear regression analysis showed that blood glucose level at testing correlated positively with all alignment spatial error parameters, indicating a probable reduction of spatial perception ability with higher blood glucose levels. These results are consistent with other cognitive studies in older healthy humans and emphasize the critical impact of early glucose dys-homeostasis on cognitive function. They also indicate that elevated blood glucose may affect cognitive functioning outside of the usual complications of diabetes.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30901/

Source: Scopus

High-normal blood glucose levels may be associated with decreased spatial perception in young healthy adults.

Authors: Razzak, R.A., Alshaiji, A.F., Qareeballa, A.A., Mohamed, M.W., Bagust, J. and Docherty, S.

Journal: PLoS One

Volume: 13

Issue: 6

Pages: e0199051

eISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0199051

Abstract:

The negative effects of high normal glucose on cognitive function were previously reported in euglycemic individuals of middle age and the elderly population. This study aimed at examining the effect of baseline blood glucose levels on spatial ability, specifically verticality perception on the computerized rod and frame test (CRFT) in young healthy adults. 63 healthy male medical students (age range from 18-23 years), of whom 30 were non-fasting outside the month of Ramadan and 33 fasting during Ramadan of the year 2016, were recruited in order to create varying degrees of glycemia during which verticality perception was carried out. Baseline blood glucose reading was obtained prior to commencing the CRFT test. Blood glucose levels at the time of testing decreased as the duration between the last meal and testing increased. A blood glucose range of 62-117 mg/dl was achieved among participants for this study. Linear regression analysis showed that blood glucose level at testing correlated positively with all alignment spatial error parameters, indicating a probable reduction of spatial perception ability with higher blood glucose levels. These results are consistent with other cognitive studies in older healthy humans and emphasize the critical impact of early glucose dys-homeostasis on cognitive function. They also indicate that elevated blood glucose may affect cognitive functioning outside of the usual complications of diabetes.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30901/

Source: PubMed

High-normal blood glucose levels may be associated with decreased spatial perception in young healthy adults

Authors: Razzak, R.A., Alshaiji, A.F., Qareeballa, A.A., Mohamed, M.W., Bagust, J. and Docherty, S.

Journal: PLOS ONE

Volume: 13

Issue: 6

ISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0199051

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30901/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Preferred by: Sharon Docherty

High-normal blood glucose levels may be associated with decreased spatial perception in young healthy adults.

Authors: Razzak, R.A., Alshaiji, A.F., Qareeballa, A.A., Mohamed, M.W., Bagust, J. and Docherty, S.

Journal: PloS one

Volume: 13

Issue: 6

Pages: e0199051

eISSN: 1932-6203

ISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0199051

Abstract:

The negative effects of high normal glucose on cognitive function were previously reported in euglycemic individuals of middle age and the elderly population. This study aimed at examining the effect of baseline blood glucose levels on spatial ability, specifically verticality perception on the computerized rod and frame test (CRFT) in young healthy adults. 63 healthy male medical students (age range from 18-23 years), of whom 30 were non-fasting outside the month of Ramadan and 33 fasting during Ramadan of the year 2016, were recruited in order to create varying degrees of glycemia during which verticality perception was carried out. Baseline blood glucose reading was obtained prior to commencing the CRFT test. Blood glucose levels at the time of testing decreased as the duration between the last meal and testing increased. A blood glucose range of 62-117 mg/dl was achieved among participants for this study. Linear regression analysis showed that blood glucose level at testing correlated positively with all alignment spatial error parameters, indicating a probable reduction of spatial perception ability with higher blood glucose levels. These results are consistent with other cognitive studies in older healthy humans and emphasize the critical impact of early glucose dys-homeostasis on cognitive function. They also indicate that elevated blood glucose may affect cognitive functioning outside of the usual complications of diabetes.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30901/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

High-normal blood glucose levels may be associated with decreased spatial perception in young healthy adults.

Authors: Razzak, R.A., Alshaiji, A.F., Qareeballa, A.A., Mohamed, M.W., Bagust, J. and Docherty, S.

Journal: PLoS One

Volume: 13

Issue: 6

ISSN: 1932-6203

Abstract:

The negative effects of high normal glucose on cognitive function were previously reported in euglycemic individuals of middle age and the elderly population. This study aimed at examining the effect of baseline blood glucose levels on spatial ability, specifically verticality perception on the computerized rod and frame test (CRFT) in young healthy adults. 63 healthy male medical students (age range from 18-23 years), of whom 30 were non-fasting outside the month of Ramadan and 33 fasting during Ramadan of the year 2016, were recruited in order to create varying degrees of glycemia during which verticality perception was carried out. Baseline blood glucose reading was obtained prior to commencing the CRFT test. Blood glucose levels at the time of testing decreased as the duration between the last meal and testing increased. A blood glucose range of 62-117 mg/dl was achieved among participants for this study. Linear regression analysis showed that blood glucose level at testing correlated positively with all alignment spatial error parameters, indicating a probable reduction of spatial perception ability with higher blood glucose levels. These results are consistent with other cognitive studies in older healthy humans and emphasize the critical impact of early glucose dys-homeostasis on cognitive function. They also indicate that elevated blood glucose may affect cognitive functioning outside of the usual complications of diabetes.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30901/

Source: BURO EPrints