Differences in sit-to-stand, standing sway and stairs between community-dwelling fallers and non-fallers: a review of the literature

Authors: Watt, A., Clark, C. and Williams, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30935/

Journal: Physical Therapy Reviews

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISSN: 1083-3196

DOI: 10.1080/10833196.2018.1470748

Background: Falls are extremely common and have a significant impact on an individual’s wellbeing. Individuals who fall often display altered function however to date no synthesis pertaining to the nature of these alterations is available. Such information is important to guide assessment and management strategies.

Objectives: To appraise and synthesize literature directly comparing community- dwelling elderly fallers with non-fallers across tasks of sit-to-stand, standing postural sway with eyes open and stairs.

Methods: A structured search of Medline, SPORTDicuss, Science Citation Index, OAIster, CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, Science Direct and Scopus databases was conducted in July 2017. Articles were limited to peer-reviewed in the English language comparing elderly community-dwelling fallers to non-fallers.

Results: Eight articles were included relating to sit-to-stand, seven for postural sway and one for stairs. Fallers stood from sitting significantly slower, with lower linear velocity and maximum power than non-fallers. This was best observed when arms were not used and when the stand was attempted as quickly as possible. Fallers displayed significantly greater sway path lengths and center of pressure velocity compared with non-fallers, but only when assessed in narrow or near narrow stance. Fallers used less force during stepping up compared with non-fallers.

Conclusion: The findings of this review suggest that activities of daily living may be able to discriminate between fallers and non-fallers therefore offering the potential for community based assessment of fallers.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Watt, A.A., Clark, C. and Williams, J.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30935/

Journal: Physical Therapy Reviews

Volume: 23

Issue: 4-5

Pages: 273-290

eISSN: 1743-288X

ISSN: 1083-3196

DOI: 10.1080/10833196.2018.1470748

© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Background: Falls are extremely common and have a significant impact on an individual’s wellbeing. Individuals who fall often display altered function however to date no synthesis pertaining to the nature of these alterations is available. Such information is important to guide assessment and management strategies. Objectives: To appraise and synthesize literature directly comparing community- dwelling elderly fallers with non-fallers across tasks of sit-to-stand, standing postural sway with eyes open and stairs. Methods: A structured search of Medline, SPORTDicuss, Science Citation Index, OAIster, CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, Science Direct and Scopus databases was conducted in July 2017. Articles were limited to peer-reviewed in the English language comparing elderly community-dwelling fallers to non-fallers. Results: Eight articles were included relating to sit-to-stand, seven for postural sway and one for stairs. Fallers stood from sitting significantly slower, with lower linear velocity and maximum power than non-fallers. This was best observed when arms were not used and when the stand was attempted as quickly as possible. Fallers displayed significantly greater sway path lengths and center of pressure velocity compared with non-fallers, but only when assessed in narrow or near narrow stance. Fallers used less force during stepping up compared with non-fallers. Conclusion: The findings of this review suggest that activities of daily living may be able to discriminate between fallers and non-fallers therefore offering the potential for community based assessment of fallers.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Watt, A.A., Clark, C. and Williams, J.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30935/

Journal: PHYSICAL THERAPY REVIEWS

Volume: 23

Issue: 4-5

Pages: 273-290

eISSN: 1743-288X

ISSN: 1083-3196

DOI: 10.1080/10833196.2018.1470748

The data on this page was last updated at 05:17 on May 25, 2020.