Generating renewable power from water hammer pressure surges

This source preferred by Ben Thomas

Authors: Roberts, A., Thomas, B., Sewell, P. and Hoare, E.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30975/

Journal: Renewable Energy

Volume: 134

Pages: 1392-1399

eISSN: 1879-0682

ISSN: 0960-1481

DOI: 10.1016/j.renene.2018.09.006

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Since the 18th century, hydraulic ram pumps have harnessed the water hammer effect to move water in a renewable and sustainable manner. This article demonstrates that, by substituting the pressurised water delivery system for an energy conversion mechanism, the operating principles behind hydraulic rams can also be adopted for the purposes of providing renewable energy. An experimental study involving a small scale model device driving a piston-crank mechanism is presented to demonstrate the concept. The peak mechanical efficiency of the test rig was found to be 25.7%, with the time-averaged efficiency varying from 0.3 to 1.7%.

This source preferred by Ben Thomas

Authors: Roberts, A., Thomas, B., Sewell, P. and Hoare, E.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30975/

Journal: Renewable Energy: An International Journal

Publisher: Elsevier

ISSN: 0960-1481

This article presents a system that makes use of water hammer pressure surges, which occur when a fluid is subjected to a sudden change in momentum, to drive a piston-crank mechanism for power generation. Given that the magnitude of a water hammer is dependent upon the change in momentum experienced by the water, rather than the initial momentum itself, such a device may have applications operating as a pico scale hydropower device. The results of an experimental study are detailed, showing that a scale-model has a peak mechanical efficiency of 25.7 % and a mean efficiency of between 0.3 - 1.7 %. Potential applications for the technology, namely pico-scale hydropower generation and energy recovery from surge tanks, are also discussed.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Roberts, A., Thomas, B., Sewell, P. and Hoare, E.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30975/

Journal: Renewable Energy

Pages: 1392-1399

eISSN: 1879-0682

ISSN: 0960-1481

DOI: 10.1016/j.renene.2018.09.006

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Since the 18th century, hydraulic ram pumps have harnessed the water hammer effect to move water in a renewable and sustainable manner. This article demonstrates that, by substituting the pressurised water delivery system for an energy conversion mechanism, the operating principles behind hydraulic rams can also be adopted for the purposes of providing renewable energy. An experimental study involving a small scale model device driving a piston-crank mechanism is presented to demonstrate the concept. The peak mechanical efficiency of the test rig was found to be 25.7%, with the time-averaged efficiency varying from 0.3 to 1.7%.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Roberts, A., Thomas, B., Sewell, P. and Hoare, E.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30975/

Journal: RENEWABLE ENERGY

Volume: 134

Pages: 1392-1399

ISSN: 0960-1481

DOI: 10.1016/j.renene.2018.09.006

The data on this page was last updated at 04:57 on June 24, 2019.