What is diabulimia and what are the implications for practice?

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Chelvanayagam, S. and James, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31284/

Journal: Br J Nurs

Volume: 27

Issue: 17

Pages: 980-986

ISSN: 0966-0461

DOI: 10.12968/bjon.2018.27.17.980

Diabulimia has become a common term used to describe a condition when a person with type 1 diabetes has an eating disorder. The individual may omit or restrict their insulin dose to lose/control weight. Evidence suggests that as many as 20% of women with type 1 diabetes may have this condition. The serious acute and long-term complications of hyperglycaemia are well documented. Detection of this condition is challenging and health professionals need to be vigilant in assessing reasons for variable glycaemic control and weight changes. Management requires a collaborative response from the specialist diabetes team in conjunction with the mental health team. Nurses must ensure that they are aware that the condition may be possible in all patients with type 1 diabetes but especially younger female patients. These patients require timely intervention to prevent any severe acute or long-term complications.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Chelvanayagam, S. and James, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31284/

Journal: British Journal of Nursing

Volume: 27

Issue: 17

Pages: 980-986

ISSN: 0966-0461

DOI: 10.12968/bjon.2018.27.17.980

©2018 MA Healthcare Ltd. Diabulimia has become a common term used to describe a condition when a person with type 1 diabetes has an eating disorder. The individual may omit or restrict their insulin dose to lose/control weight. Evidence suggests that as many as 20% of women with type 1 diabetes may have this condition. The serious acute and long-term complications of hyperglycaemia are well documented. Detection of this condition is challenging and health professionals need to be vigilant in assessing reasons for variable glycaemic control and weight changes. Management requires a collaborative response from the specialist diabetes team in conjunction with the mental health team. Nurses must ensure that they are aware that the condition may be possible in all patients with type 1 diabetes but especially younger female patients. These patients require timely intervention to prevent any severe acute or long-term complications.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:17 on May 25, 2020.