Continual Professional Development (CPD): Improving Quality of Nursing Care in Nepal

Authors: Simkhada, B., Mackay, S., Khatri, R., Sharma, C.K., Pokhrel, T., Marahatta, S., Angell, C., van Teijlingen, E. and Simkhada, P.

Journal: Health Prospect: Journal of Public Health

Volume: 15

Issue: III

Pages: 1-3

ISSN: 2091-2021

DOI: 10.3126/hprospect.v15i3.16326

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31436/

Source: Manual

Continual Professional Development (CPD): Improving Quality of Nursing Care in Nepal

Authors: Simkhada, B., Mackay, S., Khatri, R., Sharma, C.K., Pokhrel, T., Marahatta, S., Angell, C., van Teijlingen, E. and Simkhada, P.

Journal: Health Prospect: Journal of Public Health

Volume: 15

Issue: III

Pages: 1-3

ISSN: 2091-2021

Abstract:

The notion that health professionals should be accountable to people and the society they serve is not a new concept (1). Globally, health professionals are being nudged to demonstrate their commitment with continuing professional development (CPD) in order to maintain competence in light of evidence-based practice and ever changing technology in health service provision. CPD provides an important strategy to improve the knowledge and skills of health practitioners as well as the quality of service (2). The World Health Organization also stresses the need to capacity enhancement of nurses and midwives through education, training and career development in Southeast Asia (3). The member states in the Region have agreed on a Decade for Strengthening Human Resources for Health in South-East Asia, 2015–2024, and country action plans have been developed to strengthen physicians, nurses and midwives with the focus on transforming education and retention (4). This editorial highlights the importance of CPD and existing lack of such provision in the field of nursing in Nepal.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31436/

Source: BURO EPrints