Diet of invasive pikeperch Sander lucioperca: Developing non-destructive tissue sampling for stable isotope analysis with comparisons to stomach contents analysis

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Authors: Nolan, E.T. and Britton, J.R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31602/

Journal: Knowledge and Management of Aquatic Ecosystems

Volume: 418

ISSN: 1961-9502

DOI: 10.1051/kmae/2018037

© E.T. Nolan and J.R. Britton, Published by EDP Sciences 2018. Impact assessments of invasive piscivorous fishes usually rely on dietary analyses to quantify their predation pressure on prey communities. Stomach contents analysis (SCA), typically a destructive sampling method, is frequently used for this. However, many invasive piscivores are exploited by catch-and-release sport angling, with destructive sampling often not feasible. Stable isotope analysis (SIA) provides an alternative dietary analysis tool to SCA, with use of fin tissue, scales and/or epidermal mucus potentially enabling its non-destructive application. Here, the diet of a population of pikeperch Sander lucioperca, an invasive sport fish to Great Britain, was investigated by applying SIA to a range of tissues. Testing SI data of dorsal muscle (destructive sampling) versus fin, scale and mucus (non-destructive sampling) revealed highly significant relationships, indicating that the tissues collected non-destructively can be reliably applied to pikeperch diet assessments. Application of these SI data to Bayesian mixing models predicted that as S. lucioperca length increased, their diet shifted from macro-invertebrates to fish. Although similar ontogenetic patterns were evident in SCA, this was inhibited by 54% of fish having empty stomachs. Nevertheless, SCA revealed that as S. lucioperca length increased, their prey size significantly increased. However, the prey:predator length ratios ranged between 0.08 and 0.38, indicating most prey were relatively small. These results suggest that when non-destructive sampling is required for dietary analyses of sport fishes, SIA can be applied using fin, scales and/ or mucus. However, where destructive sampling has been completed, SCA provides complementary dietary insights, especially in relation to prey size.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Nolan, E.T. and Britton, J.R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31602/

Journal: KNOWLEDGE AND MANAGEMENT OF AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS

Issue: 419

ISSN: 1961-9502

DOI: 10.1051/kmae/2018037

The data on this page was last updated at 04:58 on April 25, 2019.