Being one of us: Translating expertise into performance benefits following perceived failure

This source preferred by Tim Rees

Authors: Rascle, O., Charrier, M., Higgins, N., Rees, T., Coffee, P., Le Foll, D. and Cabagno, G.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31630/

Journal: Psychology of Sport and Exercise

Volume: 43

Pages: 105-113

Publisher: Elsevier

ISSN: 1469-0292

DOI: 10.1016/j.psychsport.2019.01.010

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Rascle, O., Charrier, M., Higgins, N., Rees, T., Coffee, P., Le Foll, D. and Cabagno, G.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31630/

Journal: Psychology of Sport and Exercise

Volume: 43

Pages: 105-113

ISSN: 1469-0292

DOI: 10.1016/j.psychsport.2019.01.010

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd Is feedback delivered by an expert sufficient to improve performance? In two studies, we tested, following failure, the influence of group membership (ingroup/outgroup) and source expertise (high/low) on the effectiveness of attributional feedback on performance. Results revealed a significant interactive effect, showing an increase of performance only when the source was an expert ingroup member (Study 1). This interaction was replicated on performance and success expectations in Study 2, which were significantly higher for high compared to low expertise ingroup sources. These data suggest that sharing a common identity with those you lead may help convert expert performance advice into real performance benefits.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Rascle, O., Charrier, M., Higgins, N., Rees, T., Coffee, P., Le Foll, D. and Cabagno, G.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31630/

Journal: PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORT AND EXERCISE

Volume: 43

Pages: 105-113

eISSN: 1878-5476

ISSN: 1469-0292

DOI: 10.1016/j.psychsport.2019.01.010

The data on this page was last updated at 05:09 on February 27, 2020.