The quantification of hop landing balance using trunk mounted accelerometry

Authors: Williams, J., Gara, M. and Clark, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31991/

Journal: Journal of sport rehabilitation

Publisher: Human Kinetics Publishers, Inc.

ISSN: 1056-6716

Context: Balance is important for injury prediction, prevention and rehabilitation. Clinical measurement of higher level balance function such as hop landing is necessary. Currently no method exists to quantify balance performance following hopping in the clinic.

Objective: The objective of this study was to quantify the sacral acceleration profile and test-retest reliability during hop landing.

Participants: Seventeen university undergraduates (Age 27.6(5.7) years, Height 1.73(0.11) m, Weight 74.1(13.9)kg).

Outcome Measure: A trunk mounted accelerometer captured the acceleration profile following landing from hopping forwards, medially and laterally. The path length of the acceleration traces were computed to quantify balance following landing.

Results: Moderate-to-excellent reliability (ICC 0.67-0.93) for hop landing was established with low-to-moderate standard error of measurement (4-16%) and minimal detectable change values (13-44%) for each of the hop directions. Significant differences were determined in balance following hop landing from the different directions.

Conclusion: The results suggest hop landing balance can be quantified by trunk mounted accelerometry.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Williams, J.M., Gara, M. and Clark, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31991/

Journal: J Sport Rehabil

Pages: 1-4

eISSN: 1543-3072

DOI: 10.1123/jsr.2018-0384

Context: Balance is important for injury prediction, prevention, and rehabilitation. Clinical measurement of higher level balance function such as hop landing is necessary. Currently, no method exists to quantify balance performance following hopping in the clinic. Objective: To quantify the sacral acceleration profile and test-retest reliability during hop landing. Participants: A total of 17 university undergraduates (age 27.6 [5.7] y, height 1.73 [0.11] m, weight 74.1 [13.9] kg). Main Outcome Measure: A trunk-mounted accelerometer captured the acceleration profile following landing from hopping forward, medially, and laterally. The path length of the acceleration traces were computed to quantify balance following landing. Results: Moderate to excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient .67-.93) for hop landing was established with low to moderate SEM (4%-16%) and minimal detectable change values (13%-44%) for each of the hop directions. Significant differences were determined in balance following hop landing from the different directions. Conclusion: The results suggest that hop landing balance can be quantified by trunk-mounted accelerometry.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:09 on February 24, 2020.