The aerodynamic impact of a range of prostheses designs when cycling with a trans-tibial amputation

Authors: Dyer, B. and Disley, X.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32025/

Journal: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Dyer, B. and Disley, B.X.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32025/

Journal: Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol

Pages: 1-5

eISSN: 1748-3115

DOI: 10.1080/17483107.2019.1594409

Previous studies have proposed that an aerodynamically optimized prosthetic limb could provide performance enhancement for competitive paracyclists. Four different designs of prosthetic limbs were assessed for their impact upon the aerodynamic drag of an elite cyclist with a lower-limb amputation. The pylon area acted as the controlled location for the differences in design between the test prostheses. A validated field test method was used to derive the participant's total aerodynamic drag when using the prostheses designs. The field test method produced a repeatable experimental process and demonstrated that small changes in form made to the pylon region resulted in measurable differences to the participant's cycling performance. In addition, statistical significance was obtained between a baseline design and the prostheses prototype with the greatest aspect ratio (p= <.05). The magnitude of improvements recorded in this study could potentially influence a rider's finishing time at international sporting events like the Paralympic Games. Implications for Rehabilitation Small changes in form made to a cycling prostheses design can potentially deliver worthwhile performance enhancement. Prosthetists may obtain greater end-user satisfaction by taking a broader approach to sports prostheses design than just fit and biomechanical function alone. This study indicates that other regions of the cycling prosthesis could now benefit from aerodynamic optimization with the aim to further improve paracycling performance.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Dyer, B. and Disley, B.X.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32025/

Journal: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology

eISSN: 1748-3115

ISSN: 1748-3107

DOI: 10.1080/17483107.2019.1594409

© 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Previous studies have proposed that an aerodynamically optimized prosthetic limb could provide performance enhancement for competitive paracyclists. Four different designs of prosthetic limbs were assessed for their impact upon the aerodynamic drag of an elite cyclist with a lower-limb amputation. The pylon area acted as the controlled location for the differences in design between the test prostheses. A validated field test method was used to derive the participant’s total aerodynamic drag when using the prostheses designs. The field test method produced a repeatable experimental process and demonstrated that small changes in form made to the pylon region resulted in measurable differences to the participant’s cycling performance. In addition, statistical significance was obtained between a baseline design and the prostheses prototype with the greatest aspect ratio (p= <.05). The magnitude of improvements recorded in this study could potentially influence a rider’s finishing time at international sporting events like the Paralympic Games.Implications for Rehabilitation Small changes in form made to a cycling prostheses design can potentially deliver worthwhile performance enhancement. Prosthetists may obtain greater end-user satisfaction by taking a broader approach to sports prostheses design than just fit and biomechanical function alone. This study indicates that other regions of the cycling prosthesis could now benefit from aerodynamic optimization with the aim to further improve paracycling performance.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:17 on May 25, 2020.