People with enteral tubes and their carers' views of living with a tube and managing associated problems: A qualitative interview study

Authors: Green, S.M., Townsend, K., Jarrett, N., Westoby, C. and Fader, M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32433/

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jocn.14972

Journal: Journal of Clinical Nursing

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISSN: 0962-1067

DOI: 10.1111/jocn.14972

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Green, S.M., Townsend, K., Jarrett, N., Westoby, C. and Fader, M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32433/

Journal: J Clin Nurs

Volume: 28

Issue: 19-20

Pages: 3710-3720

eISSN: 1365-2702

DOI: 10.1111/jocn.14972

BACKGROUND: Nutrition by enteral tube is a complex therapy requiring significant management to ensure safe, timely delivery of nutrients and avoidance of complications. In the home setting, people with enteral tubes and their carers are required to self-manage the therapy, including the need to cope with problems that arise. Whilst previous studies have conveyed experiences of people with enteral tubes, few have described views on enteral tube problems. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Drawing on the findings of a previously reported study (Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 2019), this paper aims to describe in-depth the experiences of people with enteral tubes and their carers of living with the tube day to day and managing problems that arise. DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive design using semi-structured in-depth interviews was employed. METHODS: A purposive sample of 19 people with enteral tubes and 15 carers of people with tubes participated. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. Using a thematic analysis approach, codes were defined and applied; themes developed and refined. Five themes with associated subthemes were generated, of which one, "living with the tube," is reported in-depth. The COREQ checklist was used. RESULTS: Participants described the tube affecting both physical and psychosocial being and revealed it had resulted in significant changes to their daily living, necessitating adaptation to a new way of life. Participants reported spending much time and effort to manage tube problems, at times without support from healthcare practitioners knowledgeable in tube management. Discomfort associated with the tube was commonly described. CONCLUSIONS: Living with an enteral tube impacts significantly on daily life requiring adaptations to normal routine. People with tubes and their carers use a range of strategies to manage common complications. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Knowledge and understanding of how people with enteral tubes live with their tube and manage issues as they arise will enable healthcare practitioners to provide better support.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Green, S.M., Townsend, K., Jarrett, N., Westoby, C. and Fader, M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32433/

Journal: Journal of Clinical Nursing

Volume: 28

Issue: 19-20

Pages: 3710-3720

eISSN: 1365-2702

ISSN: 0962-1067

DOI: 10.1111/jocn.14972

© 2019 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Background: Nutrition by enteral tube is a complex therapy requiring significant management to ensure safe, timely delivery of nutrients and avoidance of complications. In the home setting, people with enteral tubes and their carers are required to self-manage the therapy, including the need to cope with problems that arise. Whilst previous studies have conveyed experiences of people with enteral tubes, few have described views on enteral tube problems. Aims and objectives: Drawing on the findings of a previously reported study (Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 2019), this paper aims to describe in-depth the experiences of people with enteral tubes and their carers of living with the tube day to day and managing problems that arise. Design: A qualitative descriptive design using semi-structured in-depth interviews was employed. Methods: A purposive sample of 19 people with enteral tubes and 15 carers of people with tubes participated. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. Using a thematic analysis approach, codes were defined and applied; themes developed and refined. Five themes with associated subthemes were generated, of which one, “living with the tube,” is reported in-depth. The COREQ checklist was used. Results: Participants described the tube affecting both physical and psychosocial being and revealed it had resulted in significant changes to their daily living, necessitating adaptation to a new way of life. Participants reported spending much time and effort to manage tube problems, at times without support from healthcare practitioners knowledgeable in tube management. Discomfort associated with the tube was commonly described. Conclusions: Living with an enteral tube impacts significantly on daily life requiring adaptations to normal routine. People with tubes and their carers use a range of strategies to manage common complications. Relevance to clinical practice: Knowledge and understanding of how people with enteral tubes live with their tube and manage issues as they arise will enable healthcare practitioners to provide better support.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Green, S.M., Townsend, K., Jarrett, N., Westoby, C. and Fader, M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32433/

Journal: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING

Volume: 28

Issue: 19-20

Pages: 3710-3720

eISSN: 1365-2702

ISSN: 0962-1067

DOI: 10.1111/jocn.14972

The data on this page was last updated at 05:17 on May 25, 2020.