Challenges in stakeholders self-organising to enhance disaster communication

Authors: Le Roux, T. and Van Niekerk, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33240/

Journal: Corporate Communications: an International Journal

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

Purpose - This paper combines disaster risk reduction (DRR) and communication management literature to investigate the challenges and opportunities encountered when stakeholders spontaneously self-organise communication efforts during a disaster. The 2017 Knysna Fire Disaster in South Africa is used as context.

Research methodology - The qualitative, exploratory research was supported by data obtained through thematic analysis of qualitative in-depth interviews and the Facebook page created by the community. Information from the disaster debrief was also included. Findings - The findings suggest that disaster information needs to be sent every 30 seconds to a minute to coordinate rescue and relief efforts. The challenges for disaster management teams to manage this mammoth task and the role that the self-organising community played in assisting the communication process was found not to be recognised in disaster management policies or systems. This adversely affected the work of the disaster management team and stakeholder relationship. Research limitations - This study focussed on one disaster. Future studies could possibly compare various disaster examples to provide even greater insight into the self-organising communicative behaviour of those affected by disasters. Originality/value - The research gives one of the first clear indications of the scope of disaster communication needed during a disaster. It also highlights the community’s ability to contribute to communication management during a disaster, and which is not catered for in the practice, guidelines, or management systems used for disaster management.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Le Roux, T. and Van Niekerk, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33240/

Journal: Corporate Communications

Volume: 25

Issue: 1

Pages: 128-142

ISSN: 1356-3289

DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-07-2019-0078

© 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to combine disaster risk reduction (DRR) and communication management literature to investigate the challenges and opportunities encountered when stakeholders spontaneously self-organise communication efforts during a disaster. The 2017 Knysna Fire Disaster in South Africa is used as the context. Design/methodology/approach: The qualitative, exploratory research was supported by data obtained through thematic analysis of qualitative in-depth interviews and the Facebook page created by the community. Information from the disaster debrief was also included. Findings: The findings suggest that disaster information needs to be sent every 30 s to a minute to coordinate rescue and relief efforts. The challenges for disaster management teams to manage this mammoth task and the role that the self-organising community played in assisting the communication process was found not to be recognised in disaster management policies or systems. This adversely affected the work of the disaster management team and stakeholder relationship. Research limitations/implications: This study focussed on one disaster. Future studies could possibly compare various disaster examples to provide even greater insight into the self-organising communicative behaviour of those affected by disasters. Originality/value: The research gives one of the first clear indications of the scope of disaster communication needed during a disaster. It also highlights the community’s ability to contribute to communication management during a disaster, and which is not catered for in the practice, guidelines or management systems used for disaster management.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Le Roux, T. and Van Niekerk, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33240/

Journal: CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS

Volume: 25

Issue: 1

Pages: 128-142

eISSN: 1758-6046

ISSN: 1356-3289

DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-07-2019-0078

The data on this page was last updated at 05:19 on January 20, 2021.