“Playing Mother”: Channeled Careers and the Construction of Gender in Academia

Authors: Ashencaen Crabtree, S. and Shiel, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32661/

Journal: Sage Open

Gender discrimination in the academy globally is widely recognised in terms of faculty ranking and career progression rates. UK national data notes the lower research recognition of women scholars as well as gendered pay gaps. This paper reports on a qualitative study of women academics across discipline groups at a British post-92, corporate university. Focus group discussion findings suggest that gendered career pathways are implicated in hindering the career progression of women academics. Participants perceive themselves to be regularly channelled into feminised teaching and administrative roles, considered to be less advantageous routes to progression than elite and masculinised research routes. This together with the affective intensity of academic tasks that perform as emotional labour in relation to pastoral care are critically examined as examples of both essential and essentialised roles, where key ‘mothering’ duties and ‘housekeeping’ academic roles are allocated primarily to women academics. However, although regarded as vital gendered roles and tasks are insufficient recognised and rewarded by the bureaucratic processes that exploit them for institutional ends.

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Authors: Ashencaen Crabtree, S. and Shiel, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32661/

Journal: SAGE Open

Volume: 9

Issue: 3

eISSN: 2158-2440

DOI: 10.1177/2158244019876285

© The Author(s) 2019. Gender discrimination in the academy globally is widely recognized in terms of faculty ranking and career progression rates. U.K. national data notes the lower research recognition of women scholars as well as gendered pay gaps. This article reports on a qualitative study of women academics across discipline groups at a British post-1992 corporate university. Focus group discussion findings suggest that gendered career pathways are implicated in hindering the career progression of women academics. Participants perceive themselves to be regularly channeled into feminized teaching and administrative roles considered to be less advantageous routes to progression than elite and masculinized research routes. This together with the affective intensity of academic tasks that perform as emotional labour in relation to pastoral care are critically examined as examples of both essential and essentialized roles, where key “mothering” duties and “housekeeping” academic roles are allocated primarily to women academics. However, although regarded as vital, gendered roles and tasks are insufficiently recognized and rewarded by the bureaucratic processes that exploit them for institutional ends.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Crabtree, S.A. and Shiel, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32661/

Journal: SAGE OPEN

Volume: 9

Issue: 3

ISSN: 2158-2440

DOI: 10.1177/2158244019876285

The data on this page was last updated at 05:10 on February 18, 2020.