Word Frequency, Predictability, and Return-Sweep Saccades: Towards the Modeling of Eye Movements During Paragraph Reading

This source preferred by Tim Slattery

Authors: Parker, A.J. and Slattery, T.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32802/

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

eISSN: 1939-1277

ISSN: 0096-1523

DOI: 10.1037/xhp0000694

© 2019 American Psychological Association. Models of eye movement control during reading focus on the reading of single lines of text. Within these models, word frequency and predictability are important input variables which influence fixation probabilities and durations. However, a comprehensive model of eye movement control will have to account for readers' eye movements across multiline texts. Line-initial words are unlike those presented midline; they are routinely unavailable for parafoveal preprocessing. Therefore, it is unclear whether and how word frequency and predictability influence reading times on line-initial words. To address this, we present an analysis of the Provo Corpus (Luke & Christianson, 2018) followed by a novel eye-movement experiment. We conclude that word frequency and predictability impact single-fixation and gaze durations on line-initial words. We also observed that return-sweep error (undersweep-fixations) may, among several other possibilities, allow for parafoveal processing of line-initial words prior to their direct fixation. Implications for models of eye movement control during reading are discussed.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Parker, A.J. and Slattery, T.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32802/

Journal: J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform

Volume: 45

Issue: 12

Pages: 1614-1633

eISSN: 1939-1277

DOI: 10.1037/xhp0000694

Models of eye movement control during reading focus on the reading of single lines of text. Within these models, word frequency and predictability are important input variables which influence fixation probabilities and durations. However, a comprehensive model of eye movement control will have to account for readers' eye movements across multiline texts. Line-initial words are unlike those presented midline; they are routinely unavailable for parafoveal preprocessing. Therefore, it is unclear whether and how word frequency and predictability influence reading times on line-initial words. To address this, we present an analysis of the Provo Corpus (Luke & Christianson, 2018) followed by a novel eye-movement experiment. We conclude that word frequency and predictability impact single-fixation and gaze durations on line-initial words. We also observed that return-sweep error (undersweep-fixations) may, among several other possibilities, allow for parafoveal processing of line-initial words prior to their direct fixation. Implications for models of eye movement control during reading are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Parker, A.J. and Slattery, T.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32802/

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

eISSN: 1939-1277

ISSN: 0096-1523

DOI: 10.1037/xhp0000694

© 2019 American Psychological Association. Models of eye movement control during reading focus on the reading of single lines of text. Within these models, word frequency and predictability are important input variables which influence fixation probabilities and durations. However, a comprehensive model of eye movement control will have to account for readers' eye movements across multiline texts. Line-initial words are unlike those presented midline; they are routinely unavailable for parafoveal preprocessing. Therefore, it is unclear whether and how word frequency and predictability influence reading times on line-initial words. To address this, we present an analysis of the Provo Corpus (Luke & Christianson, 2018) followed by a novel eye-movement experiment. We conclude that word frequency and predictability impact single-fixation and gaze durations on line-initial words. We also observed that return-sweep error (undersweep-fixations) may, among several other possibilities, allow for parafoveal processing of line-initial words prior to their direct fixation. Implications for models of eye movement control during reading are discussed.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Parker, A.J. and Slattery, T.J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32802/

Journal: JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-HUMAN PERCEPTION AND PERFORMANCE

Volume: 45

Issue: 12

Pages: 1614-1633

eISSN: 1939-1277

ISSN: 0096-1523

DOI: 10.1037/xhp0000694

The data on this page was last updated at 05:30 on November 25, 2020.