Slow freezing versus vitrification for the cryopreservation of zebrafish (Danio rerio) ovarian tissue

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Marques, L.S., Fossati, A.A.N., Rodrigues, R.B., Da Rosa, H.T., Izaguirry, A.P., Ramalho, J.B., Moreira, J.C.F., Santos, F.W., Zhang, T. and Streit, D.P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32999/

Journal: Sci Rep

Volume: 9

Issue: 1

Pages: 15353

eISSN: 2045-2322

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-51696-7

The aim of the present study was to compare the efficiency of vitrification and slow freezing techniques for the cryopreservation of zebrafish ovarian tissue containing immature follicles. In Experiment 1, assessment of cell membrane integrity by trypan blue exclusion staining was used to select the best cryoprotectant solution for each cryopreservation method. Primary growth (PG) oocytes showed the best percentage of membrane integrity (63.5 ± 2.99%) when SF4 solution (2 M methanol + 0.1 M trehalose + 10% egg yolk solution) was employed. The vitrification solution, which presented the highest membrane integrity (V2; 1.5 M methanol + 5.5 M Me2SO + 0.5 M sucrose + 10% egg yolk solution) was selected for Experiment 2. Experiment 2 aimed to compare the vitrification and slow freezing techniques in the following parameters: morphology, oxidative stress, mitochondrial activity, and DNA damage. Frozen ovarian tissue showed higher ROS levels and lower mitochondrial activity than vitrified ovarian tissue. Ultrastructural observations of frozen PG oocytes showed rupture of the plasma membrane, loss of intracellular contents and a large number of damaged mitochondria, while vitrified PG oocytes had intact mitochondria and cell plasma membranes. We conclude that vitrification may be more effective than slow freezing for the cryopreservation of zebrafish ovarian tissue.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Marques, L.S., Fossati, A.A.N., Rodrigues, R.B., Da Rosa, H.T., Izaguirry, A.P., Ramalho, J.B., Moreira, J.C.F., Santos, F.W., Zhang, T. and Streit, D.P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32999/

Journal: Scientific Reports

Volume: 9

Issue: 1

eISSN: 2045-2322

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-51696-7

© 2019, The Author(s). The aim of the present study was to compare the efficiency of vitrification and slow freezing techniques for the cryopreservation of zebrafish ovarian tissue containing immature follicles. In Experiment 1, assessment of cell membrane integrity by trypan blue exclusion staining was used to select the best cryoprotectant solution for each cryopreservation method. Primary growth (PG) oocytes showed the best percentage of membrane integrity (63.5 ± 2.99%) when SF4 solution (2 M methanol + 0.1 M trehalose + 10% egg yolk solution) was employed. The vitrification solution, which presented the highest membrane integrity (V2; 1.5 M methanol + 5.5 M Me2SO + 0.5 M sucrose + 10% egg yolk solution) was selected for Experiment 2. Experiment 2 aimed to compare the vitrification and slow freezing techniques in the following parameters: morphology, oxidative stress, mitochondrial activity, and DNA damage. Frozen ovarian tissue showed higher ROS levels and lower mitochondrial activity than vitrified ovarian tissue. Ultrastructural observations of frozen PG oocytes showed rupture of the plasma membrane, loss of intracellular contents and a large number of damaged mitochondria, while vitrified PG oocytes had intact mitochondria and cell plasma membranes. We conclude that vitrification may be more effective than slow freezing for the cryopreservation of zebrafish ovarian tissue.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Marques, L.S., Fossati, A.A.N., Rodrigues, R.B., Da Rosa, H.T., Izaguirry, A.P., Ramalho, J.B., Moreira, J.C.F., Santos, F.W., Zhang, T. and Streit Jr, D.P.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32999/

Journal: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS

Volume: 9

ISSN: 2045-2322

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-51696-7

The data on this page was last updated at 05:12 on February 26, 2020.