The use of finger foods in care settings: an integrative review

Authors: Heelan, M., Prieto, J., Roberts, H., Gallant, N., Barnes, C. and Green, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33043/

Journal: Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics

ISSN: 0952-3871

DOI: 10.1111/jhn.12725

Background: Reduced food intake is prevalent in people in residential and hospital care settings. Little is known about the use of finger-foods, (foods eaten without cutlery), to increase feeding independence and food intake. The Social Care Institute for Excellence (1) recommends the use of finger foods to enable mealtime independence and to prevent loss of dignity and embarrassment when eating in front of others. The aim of this review is to identify and evaluate existing literature regarding the use and effectiveness of finger foods among adults in health and social care settings. Methods: An integrative review methodology was used. A systematic search of electronic databases for published empirical research was undertaken in October 2018. Following screening of titles and abstracts, the full text of publications, which investigated outcomes associated with the provision of finger foods in adult care settings, were retrieved and assessed for inclusion. Two independent investigators conducted data extraction and quality assessment using Critical Appraisal Skills Programme checklists. Thematic analysis was used to summarise the findings. Results: Six studies met the inclusion criteria. Four themes were identified: Finger food menu implementation; Importance of a team approach; Effect on nutrition and Influence on wellbeing. Study designs were poorly reported, with small sample sizes. Conclusions: There is some evidence that provision of finger foods may positively affect patient outcomes in long-term care settings. There is a paucity of research evaluating the use of a finger food menu in acute care settings, including economic evaluation. Future high quality trials are required.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Heelan, M., Prieto, J., Roberts, H., Gallant, N., Barnes, C. and Green, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33043/

Journal: J Hum Nutr Diet

Volume: 33

Issue: 2

Pages: 187-197

eISSN: 1365-277X

DOI: 10.1111/jhn.12725

BACKGROUND: Reduced food intake is prevalent in people in residential and hospital care settings. Little is known about the use of finger foods (i.e. foods eaten without cutlery) with respect to increasing feeding independence and food intake. The Social Care Institute for Excellence (Malnutrition Task Force: State of the Nation, 2017) recommends the use of finger foods to enable mealtime independence and to prevent loss of dignity and embarrassment when eating in front of others. The aim of this review is to identify and evaluate the existing literature regarding the use and effectiveness of finger foods among adults in health and social care settings. METHODS: An integrative review methodology was used. A systematic search of electronic databases for published empirical research was undertaken in October 2018. Following screening of titles and abstracts, the full texts of publications, which investigated outcomes associated with the provision of finger foods in adult care settings, were retrieved and assessed for inclusion. Two independent investigators conducted data extraction and quality assessment using Critical Appraisal Skills Programme checklists. Thematic analysis was used to summarise the findings. RESULTS: Six studies met the inclusion criteria. Four themes were identified: Finger food menu implementation; Importance of a team approach; Effect on nutrition; and Influence on wellbeing. Study designs were poorly reported, with small sample sizes. CONCLUSIONS: There is some evidence that the provision of finger foods may positively affect patient outcomes in long-term care settings. There is a paucity of research evaluating the use of a finger food menu in acute care settings, including economic evaluation. Future high quality trials are required.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Heelan, M., Prieto, J., Roberts, H., Gallant, N., Barnes, C. and Green, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33043/

Journal: Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics

Volume: 33

Issue: 2

Pages: 187-197

eISSN: 1365-277X

ISSN: 0952-3871

DOI: 10.1111/jhn.12725

© 2019 The British Dietetic Association Ltd. Background: Reduced food intake is prevalent in people in residential and hospital care settings. Little is known about the use of finger foods (i.e. foods eaten without cutlery) with respect to increasing feeding independence and food intake. The Social Care Institute for Excellence (Malnutrition Task Force: State of the Nation, 2017) recommends the use of finger foods to enable mealtime independence and to prevent loss of dignity and embarrassment when eating in front of others. The aim of this review is to identify and evaluate the existing literature regarding the use and effectiveness of finger foods among adults in health and social care settings. Methods: An integrative review methodology was used. A systematic search of electronic databases for published empirical research was undertaken in October 2018. Following screening of titles and abstracts, the full texts of publications, which investigated outcomes associated with the provision of finger foods in adult care settings, were retrieved and assessed for inclusion. Two independent investigators conducted data extraction and quality assessment using Critical Appraisal Skills Programme checklists. Thematic analysis was used to summarise the findings. Results: Six studies met the inclusion criteria. Four themes were identified: Finger food menu implementation; Importance of a team approach; Effect on nutrition; and Influence on wellbeing. Study designs were poorly reported, with small sample sizes. Conclusions: There is some evidence that the provision of finger foods may positively affect patient outcomes in long-term care settings. There is a paucity of research evaluating the use of a finger food menu in acute care settings, including economic evaluation. Future high quality trials are required.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Heelan, M., Prieto, J., Roberts, H., Gallant, N., Barnes, C. and Green, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33043/

Journal: JOURNAL OF HUMAN NUTRITION AND DIETETICS

Volume: 33

Issue: 2

Pages: 187-197

eISSN: 1365-277X

ISSN: 0952-3871

DOI: 10.1111/jhn.12725

The data on this page was last updated at 05:17 on May 25, 2020.