Egypt’s feminist counterpublic: The re-invigoration of the post-revolution public sphere

This source preferred by Dalia Elsheikh

Authors: Elsheikh, D. and Lilleker, D.G.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33136/

https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444819890576

Journal: NEW MEDIA & SOCIETY

eISSN: 1461-7315

ISSN: 1461-4448

DOI: 10.1177/1461444819890576

This study examines the current feminist counterculture movements which appears to be reinvigorating the Egyptian public sphere. The study argues women in particular have been able to find themselves alternative ways to develop a discourse focused on a desire for social changes around which they can unite. In focusing on lifestyle issues that normally are discussed only in small private spheres, they are able to challenge norms while not provoking the state or security apparatus and avoiding becoming part of the polarised political environment. This article explores the dynamics and motivations of these groups through a case study of three of the networked feminist movements. Our data from semi-structured interviews with the founders show that they grew from networks to movements which then evolved in order to be sustainable. This article argues that through the process of their evolution, these movements are helping strengthen the public sphere and enhance Egyptian democracy.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Elsheikh, D. and Lilleker, D.G.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33136/

Journal: New Media and Society

eISSN: 1461-7315

ISSN: 1461-4448

DOI: 10.1177/1461444819890576

© The Author(s) 2019. This study examines the current feminist counterculture movements which appears to be reinvigorating the Egyptian public sphere. The study argues women in particular have been able to find themselves alternative ways to develop a discourse focused on a desire for social changes around which they can unite. In focusing on lifestyle issues that normally are discussed only in small private spheres, they are able to challenge norms while not provoking the state or security apparatus and avoiding becoming part of the polarised political environment. This article explores the dynamics and motivations of these groups through a case study of three of the networked feminist movements. Our data from semi-structured interviews with the founders show that they grew from networks to movements which then evolved in order to be sustainable. This article argues that through the process of their evolution, these movements are helping strengthen the public sphere and enhance Egyptian democracy.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Elsheikh, D. and Lilleker, D.G.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33136/

Journal: NEW MEDIA & SOCIETY

eISSN: 1461-7315

ISSN: 1461-4448

DOI: 10.1177/1461444819890576

The data on this page was last updated at 05:16 on April 3, 2020.