TetraGrip–a four channel upper limb FES device for people with C5/C6 tetraplegia: device design and clinical outcome

Authors: Venugopalan, L., Taylor, P.N., Cobb, J.E. and Swain, I.D.

Journal: Journal of Medical Engineering and Technology

Volume: 44

Issue: 1

Pages: 38-44

eISSN: 1464-522X

ISSN: 0309-1902

DOI: 10.1080/03091902.2020.1713239

Abstract:

The TetraGrip is an inertial measurement unit-controlled surface upper limb FES device developed for improving hand functions of people with tetraplegia. The reliability of the control system and the repeatability and reproducibility of the device were assessed by analysing the results obtained when 14 able-bodied volunteers used the device. These volunteers were able to generate the control signals effectively once they had sufficient training. The two tetraplegic volunteers participated in a 12-week long clinical study (exercise, 4 weeks; functional tasks, 8 weeks), where they used the device to perform functional tasks. Outcome measures used were the grasp release test, the grip strength test, and the box and block test. Both tetraplegic volunteers showed improvement in performing the tasks specified in all outcome measures. The TetraGrip performed as intended when the able-bodied volunteers used it, and it improved the hand functions of both volunteers with tetraplegia. However, a larger clinical study is necessary to assess the performance of the device with a wider range of people with tetraplegia such as those with C5 complete/incomplete.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33346/

Source: Scopus

TetraGrip - a four channel upper limb FES device for people with C5/C6 tetraplegia: device design and clinical outcome.

Authors: Venugopalan, L., Taylor, P.N., Cobb, J.E. and Swain, I.D.

Journal: J Med Eng Technol

Volume: 44

Issue: 1

Pages: 38-44

eISSN: 1464-522X

DOI: 10.1080/03091902.2020.1713239

Abstract:

The TetraGrip is an inertial measurement unit-controlled surface upper limb FES device developed for improving hand functions of people with tetraplegia. The reliability of the control system and the repeatability and reproducibility of the device were assessed by analysing the results obtained when 14 able-bodied volunteers used the device. These volunteers were able to generate the control signals effectively once they had sufficient training. The two tetraplegic volunteers participated in a 12-week long clinical study (exercise, 4 weeks; functional tasks, 8 weeks), where they used the device to perform functional tasks. Outcome measures used were the grasp release test, the grip strength test, and the box and block test. Both tetraplegic volunteers showed improvement in performing the tasks specified in all outcome measures. The TetraGrip performed as intended when the able-bodied volunteers used it, and it improved the hand functions of both volunteers with tetraplegia. However, a larger clinical study is necessary to assess the performance of the device with a wider range of people with tetraplegia such as those with C5 complete/incomplete.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33346/

Source: PubMed

TetraGrip - a four channel upper limb FES device for people with C5/C6 tetraplegia: device design and clinical outcome.

Authors: Venugopalan, L., Taylor, P.N., Cobb, J.E. and Swain, I.D.

Journal: Journal of medical engineering & technology

Volume: 44

Issue: 1

Pages: 38-44

eISSN: 1464-522X

ISSN: 0309-1902

DOI: 10.1080/03091902.2020.1713239

Abstract:

The TetraGrip is an inertial measurement unit-controlled surface upper limb FES device developed for improving hand functions of people with tetraplegia. The reliability of the control system and the repeatability and reproducibility of the device were assessed by analysing the results obtained when 14 able-bodied volunteers used the device. These volunteers were able to generate the control signals effectively once they had sufficient training. The two tetraplegic volunteers participated in a 12-week long clinical study (exercise, 4 weeks; functional tasks, 8 weeks), where they used the device to perform functional tasks. Outcome measures used were the grasp release test, the grip strength test, and the box and block test. Both tetraplegic volunteers showed improvement in performing the tasks specified in all outcome measures. The TetraGrip performed as intended when the able-bodied volunteers used it, and it improved the hand functions of both volunteers with tetraplegia. However, a larger clinical study is necessary to assess the performance of the device with a wider range of people with tetraplegia such as those with C5 complete/incomplete.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33346/

Source: Europe PubMed Central