Game of two passions: A football fan's autoethnography

Authors: Parry, K.D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34264/

Journal: Qualitative Research Journal

Volume: 12

Issue: 2

Pages: 238-250

DOI: 10.1108/14439881211248374

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Authors: Parry, K.D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34264/

Journal: Qualitative Research Journal

Volume: 12

Issue: 2

Pages: 238-250

eISSN: 1448-0980

ISSN: 1443-9883

DOI: 10.1108/14439881211248374

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of autoethnography within the context of sports fandom. This paper advocates the use of such qualitative methodologies to enable a greater understanding of sports fans. The paper also aims to provide greater understanding of sports fandom. Design/methodology/approach: The research moves away from traditional methodologies of studying sports fandom from an objective viewpoint and uses an evocative autoethnography to provide an account of the lived experience of a sports fan. Findings: By writing himself into his research it has been possible to gain a deeper insight into sports fandom. The subject of passion arises and while the Dualistic Model of Passion was explored as a mechanism for dealing with obsessive passion it is suggested that attempting to move away from a state of obsessive passion may diminish the enjoyment of being a sports fan. Practical implications: This paper highlights the benefits that methodologies such as autoethnography can have for academics studying sports fandom and other disciplines. It encourages academics to overcome the perceived lack of academic acceptance of the method. Originality/value: This paper utilises a qualitative methodology to explore the experience of being a sports fan. This methodological approach is yet to be fully embraced within this field and hence there is a lack of in-depth data on the experiences of sports fans. This account will allow readers to develop a greater understanding and insight of sports fans. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

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