Supporting women who develop poor postnatal mental health: What support do fathers receive to support their partner and their own mental health?

Authors: Mayers, A., Hambidge, S., Bryant, O. and Arden-Close, E.

Journal: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth

Volume: 20

Issue: 1

eISSN: 1471-2393

DOI: 10.1186/s12884-020-03043-2

Abstract:

Background: Research regarding support provided for poor maternal postnatal mental health (such as depression, anxiety disorders, and postpartum psychosis) is relatively common. Fathers appear to play an important role supporting partners but many feel alienated within maternity services. Research focusing on fathers is less common. Methods: The current qualitative study aimed to investigate fathers' experience of support provided to fathers, to help support their partner should she experience poor postnatal mental health. Results: Twenty-five fathers participated in an online questionnaire regarding their experience of their partner's poor postnatal mental health and the support provided to fathers to help her. Thematic analysis revealed three main themes and seven sub-themes. The themes were: 'Support received to help support their partner', 'Support fathers wanted that was not received' and 'Father's mental health'. The results highlight an overall lack of support for many fathers, despite many wanting support on how to help their partner, information on their own mental health and the services available. Fathers specifically wanted healthcare professionals to sign-post them to someone they can talk to for emotional support, and to be taught coping strategies which would help them to support both their partner and baby. Conclusions: The findings from this study suggest that health professionals and perinatal mental health services need a better understanding about what resources fathers need to support the mental health of themselves and their partner.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34177/

Source: Scopus

Supporting women who develop poor postnatal mental health: what support do fathers receive to support their partner and their own mental health?

Authors: Mayers, A., Hambidge, S., Bryant, O. and Arden-Close, E.

Journal: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth

Volume: 20

Issue: 1

Pages: 359

eISSN: 1471-2393

DOI: 10.1186/s12884-020-03043-2

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Research regarding support provided for poor maternal postnatal mental health (such as depression, anxiety disorders, and postpartum psychosis) is relatively common. Fathers appear to play an important role supporting partners but many feel alienated within maternity services. Research focusing on fathers is less common. METHODS: The current qualitative study aimed to investigate fathers' experience of support provided to fathers, to help support their partner should she experience poor postnatal mental health. RESULTS: Twenty-five fathers participated in an online questionnaire regarding their experience of their partner's poor postnatal mental health and the support provided to fathers to help her. Thematic analysis revealed three main themes and seven sub-themes. The themes were: 'Support received to help support their partner', 'Support fathers wanted that was not received' and 'Father's mental health'. The results highlight an overall lack of support for many fathers, despite many wanting support on how to help their partner, information on their own mental health and the services available. Fathers specifically wanted healthcare professionals to sign-post them to someone they can talk to for emotional support, and to be taught coping strategies which would help them to support both their partner and baby. CONCLUSIONS: The findings from this study suggest that health professionals and perinatal mental health services need a better understanding about what resources fathers need to support the mental health of themselves and their partner.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34177/

Source: PubMed

Supporting women who develop poor postnatal mental health: what support do fathers receive to support their partner and their own mental health?

Authors: Mayers, A., Hambidge, S., Bryant, O. and Arden-Close, E.

Journal: BMC PREGNANCY AND CHILDBIRTH

Volume: 20

Issue: 1

eISSN: 1471-2393

DOI: 10.1186/s12884-020-03043-2

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34177/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Supporting women who develop poor postnatal mental health: what support do fathers receive to support their partner and their own mental health?

Authors: Mayers, A., Hambidge, S., Bryant, O. and Arden-Close, E.

Journal: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth

Volume: 20

Pages: 359

Publisher: BioMed Central

ISSN: 1471-2393

DOI: 10.1186/s12884-020-03043-2

Abstract:

Background: Research regarding support provided for poor maternal postnatal mental health (such as depression, anxiety disorders, and postpartum psychosis) is relatively common. Fathers appear to play an important role supporting partners but many feel alienated within maternity services. Research focusing on fathers is less common. Methods: The current qualitative study aimed to investigate fathers’ experience of support provided to fathers, to help support their partner should she experience poor postnatal mental health. Results: Twenty-five fathers participated in an online questionnaire regarding their experience of their partner’s poor postnatal mental health and the support provided to fathers to help her. Thematic analysis revealed three main themes and seven sub-themes. The themes were: ‘Support received to help support their partner’, ‘Support fathers wanted that was not received’ and ‘Father’s mental health’. The results highlight an overall lack of support for many fathers, despite many wanting support on how to help their partner, information on their own mental health and the services available. Fathers specifically wanted healthcare professionals to sign-post them to someone they can talk to for emotional support, and to be taught coping strategies which would help them to support both their partner and baby. Conclusions: The findings from this study suggest that health professionals and perinatal mental health services need a better understanding about what resources fathers need to support the mental health of themselves and their partner. Keywords: Maternal mental health, Maternal postnatal depression, Fathers’ wellbeing, Maternity services, Pregnancy, Mental health

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34177/

https://link.springer.com/epdf/10.1186/s12884-020-03043-2?sharing_token=h588shEigpywaxqb-uhIoW_BpE1tBhCbnbw3BuzI2ROEP6bpZXFlKVjtTwHghkqcm9dLE0eNFRwy8jzA5Uxp7j61lSXQUlvJ15eiAg-Vbl28Ewv2ZfC6SFD9cln7yTFQlaOaclPHJLwqh3dI_Hkx2w-h_iOXtxex2j2eW3MiHZU%3D

Source: Manual

Supporting women who develop poor postnatal mental health: what support do fathers receive to support their partner and their own mental health?

Authors: Mayers, A., Hambidge, S., Bryant, O. and Arden-Close, E.

Journal: BMC pregnancy and childbirth

Volume: 20

Issue: 1

Pages: 359

eISSN: 1471-2393

ISSN: 1471-2393

DOI: 10.1186/s12884-020-03043-2

Abstract:

Background

Research regarding support provided for poor maternal postnatal mental health (such as depression, anxiety disorders, and postpartum psychosis) is relatively common. Fathers appear to play an important role supporting partners but many feel alienated within maternity services. Research focusing on fathers is less common.

Methods

The current qualitative study aimed to investigate fathers' experience of support provided to fathers, to help support their partner should she experience poor postnatal mental health.

Results

Twenty-five fathers participated in an online questionnaire regarding their experience of their partner's poor postnatal mental health and the support provided to fathers to help her. Thematic analysis revealed three main themes and seven sub-themes. The themes were: 'Support received to help support their partner', 'Support fathers wanted that was not received' and 'Father's mental health'. The results highlight an overall lack of support for many fathers, despite many wanting support on how to help their partner, information on their own mental health and the services available. Fathers specifically wanted healthcare professionals to sign-post them to someone they can talk to for emotional support, and to be taught coping strategies which would help them to support both their partner and baby.

Conclusions

The findings from this study suggest that health professionals and perinatal mental health services need a better understanding about what resources fathers need to support the mental health of themselves and their partner.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34177/

Source: Europe PubMed Central