Music-making and forced migrants’ affective practices of diasporic belonging

Authors: De Martini Ugolotti, N.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34266/

Journal: Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISSN: 0047-9586

Amid the normalisation of xenophobic narratives surrounding migration, and an overarching ‘hostile environment’ regulating asylum in Britain, this paper explores music-making as a unique lens to highlight the negotiation of belonging, uncertainty and marginality amongst a group of fifty forced migrants in Bristol. Through a focus addressing the nexus between power, affect and the everyday, this paper discusses how the dehumanising processes that characterise the British asylum regime operate in and through the spaces, bodies and objects constituting its ‘ordinary’ materiality. Concurrently, this paper addresses how the entanglement of bodies, ‘things’ and sounds emerging from the co-creation of weekly music groups enabled the group participants to negotiate pleasure, expression and sociality in a context of enforced marginality and uncertainty. Consequently, this paper discusses the music-making sessions as affective practices of diasporic belonging: relationalities arising from multiple forms of displacement that enabled momentary, but productive domains of sociability, co-presence and solidarity beyond ethnic, national, gendered and religious lines. The conclusions consider the contributions of theoretical approaches enabling researchers (and potentially advocates and community organisers) to recognise the stakes and significance of forced migrants’ (in)visible forms of sociality that take place beside the discursive and institutional frames of State and humanitarian interventions.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: De Martini Ugolotti, N.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34266/

Journal: Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies

Pages: 1-18

eISSN: 1469-9451

ISSN: 1369-183X

DOI: 10.1080/1369183X.2020.1790344

© 2020, © 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Amid the normalisation of xenophobic narratives surrounding migration, and an overarching ‘hostile environment’ regulating asylum in Britain, this paper explores music-making as a unique lens to highlight the negotiation of belonging, uncertainty and marginality amongst a group of fifty forced migrants in Bristol. Through a focus addressing the nexus between power, affect and the everyday, this paper discusses how the dehumanising processes that characterise the British asylum regime operate in and through the spaces, bodies and objects constituting its ‘ordinary’ materiality. Concurrently, this paper addresses how the entanglement of bodies, ‘things’ and sounds emerging from the co-creation of weekly music groups enabled the group participants to negotiate pleasure, expression and sociality in a context of enforced marginality and uncertainty. Consequently, this paper discusses the music-making sessions as affective practices of diasporic belonging: relationalities arising from multiple forms of displacement that enabled momentary, but productive domains of sociability, co-presence and solidarity beyond ethnic, national, gendered and religious lines. The conclusions consider the contributions of theoretical approaches enabling researchers (and potentially advocates and community organisers) to recognise the stakes and significance of forced migrants’ (in)visible forms of sociality that take place beside the discursive and institutional frames of State and humanitarian interventions.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Ugolotti, N.D.M.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34266/

Journal: JOURNAL OF ETHNIC AND MIGRATION STUDIES

eISSN: 1469-9451

ISSN: 1369-183X

DOI: 10.1080/1369183X.2020.1790344

The data on this page was last updated at 05:19 on January 20, 2021.