The effects of moderate alterations in adrenergic activity on acute appetite regulation in obese women: A randomised crossover trial

Authors: Tsofliou, F., Pitsiladis, Y.P., Lara, J., Hadjicharalambous, M., Macdonald, I.A., Wallace, M.A. and Lean, M.E.J.

Journal: Nutrition and Health

Volume: 26

Issue: 4

Pages: 311-322

eISSN: 2047-945X

ISSN: 0260-1060

DOI: 10.1177/0260106020942117

Abstract:

Background: Previous evidence has demonstrated that serum leptin is correlated with appetite in combination with, but not without, modest exercise. Aim: The present experiments investigated the effects of exogenous adrenaline and α/β adrenoceptor blockade in combination with moderate exercise on serum leptin concentrations, appetite/satiety sensations and subsequent food intake in obese women. Methods: A total of 10 obese women ((mean ± SEM), age: 50 (1.9) years, body mass index 36 (4.1) kg/m2, waist 104.8 (4.1) cm) participated in two separate, double-blind randomised experimental trials. Experiment 1: moderate exercise after α/β adrenergic blocker (labetalol, 100 mg orally) versus moderate exercise plus placebo; experiment 2: adrenaline infusion for 20 minutes versus saline infusion. Appetite/satiety and biochemistry were measured at baseline, pre- and immediately post-intervention, then 1 hour post-intervention (i.e., before dinner). Food intake was assessed via ad libitum buffet-style dinner. Results: No differences were found in appetite/satiety, subsequent food intake or serum leptin in any of the studies (experiment 1 or experiment 2). In experiment 1, blood glucose was higher (p ' 0.01) and plasma free fatty acids lower (p = 0.04) versus placebo. In experiment 2, plasma free fatty acids (p ' 0.05) increased after adrenaline versus saline infusion. Conclusions: Neither inhibition of exercise-induced adrenergic activity by combined α/β adrenergic blockade nor moderate increases in adrenergic activity induced by intravenous adrenaline infusion affected acute appetite regulation.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34393/

Source: Scopus

The effects of moderate alterations in adrenergic activity on acute appetite regulation in obese women: A randomised crossover trial.

Authors: Tsofliou, F., Pitsiladis, Y.P., Lara, J., Hadjicharalambous, M., Macdonald, I.A., Wallace, M.A. and Lean, M.E.J.

Journal: Nutr Health

Volume: 26

Issue: 4

Pages: 311-322

ISSN: 0260-1060

DOI: 10.1177/0260106020942117

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Previous evidence has demonstrated that serum leptin is correlated with appetite in combination with, but not without, modest exercise. AIM: The present experiments investigated the effects of exogenous adrenaline and α/β adrenoceptor blockade in combination with moderate exercise on serum leptin concentrations, appetite/satiety sensations and subsequent food intake in obese women. METHODS: A total of 10 obese women ((mean ± SEM), age: 50 (1.9) years, body mass index 36 (4.1) kg/m2, waist 104.8 (4.1) cm) participated in two separate, double-blind randomised experimental trials. Experiment 1: moderate exercise after α/β adrenergic blocker (labetalol, 100 mg orally) versus moderate exercise plus placebo; experiment 2: adrenaline infusion for 20 minutes versus saline infusion. Appetite/satiety and biochemistry were measured at baseline, pre- and immediately post-intervention, then 1 hour post-intervention (i.e., before dinner). Food intake was assessed via ad libitum buffet-style dinner. RESULTS: No differences were found in appetite/satiety, subsequent food intake or serum leptin in any of the studies (experiment 1 or experiment 2). In experiment 1, blood glucose was higher (p < 0.01) and plasma free fatty acids lower (p = 0.04) versus placebo. In experiment 2, plasma free fatty acids (p < 0.05) increased after adrenaline versus saline infusion. CONCLUSIONS: Neither inhibition of exercise-induced adrenergic activity by combined α/β adrenergic blockade nor moderate increases in adrenergic activity induced by intravenous adrenaline infusion affected acute appetite regulation.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34393/

Source: PubMed

The effects of moderate alterations in adrenergic activity on acute appetite regulation in obese women: A randomised crossover trial.

Authors: Tsofliou, F., Pitsiladis, Y.P., Lara, J., Hadjicharalambous, M., Macdonald, I.A., Wallace, M.A. and Lean, M.E.J.

Journal: Nutrition and health

Volume: 26

Issue: 4

Pages: 311-322

ISSN: 0260-1060

DOI: 10.1177/0260106020942117

Abstract:

Background

Previous evidence has demonstrated that serum leptin is correlated with appetite in combination with, but not without, modest exercise.

Aim

The present experiments investigated the effects of exogenous adrenaline and α/β adrenoceptor blockade in combination with moderate exercise on serum leptin concentrations, appetite/satiety sensations and subsequent food intake in obese women.

Methods

A total of 10 obese women ((mean ± SEM), age: 50 (1.9) years, body mass index 36 (4.1) kg/m2, waist 104.8 (4.1) cm) participated in two separate, double-blind randomised experimental trials. Experiment 1: moderate exercise after α/β adrenergic blocker (labetalol, 100 mg orally) versus moderate exercise plus placebo; experiment 2: adrenaline infusion for 20 minutes versus saline infusion. Appetite/satiety and biochemistry were measured at baseline, pre- and immediately post-intervention, then 1 hour post-intervention (i.e., before dinner). Food intake was assessed via ad libitum buffet-style dinner.

Results

No differences were found in appetite/satiety, subsequent food intake or serum leptin in any of the studies (experiment 1 or experiment 2). In experiment 1, blood glucose was higher (p < 0.01) and plasma free fatty acids lower (p = 0.04) versus placebo. In experiment 2, plasma free fatty acids (p < 0.05) increased after adrenaline versus saline infusion.

Conclusions

Neither inhibition of exercise-induced adrenergic activity by combined α/β adrenergic blockade nor moderate increases in adrenergic activity induced by intravenous adrenaline infusion affected acute appetite regulation.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34393/

Source: Europe PubMed Central