Cyanobacterial abundance and microcystin profiles in two Southern British Lakes: The importance of abiotic and biotic interactions

Authors: Hartnell, D.M., Chapman, I.J., Taylor, N.G.H., Esteban, G.F., Turner, A.D. and Franklin, D.J.

Journal: Toxins

Volume: 12

Issue: 8

eISSN: 2072-6651

DOI: 10.3390/toxins12080503

Abstract:

Freshwater cyanobacteria blooms represent a risk to ecological and human health through induction of anoxia and release of potent toxins; both conditions require water management to mitigate risks. Many cyanobacteria taxa may produce microcystins, a group of toxic cyclic heptapeptides. Understanding the relationships between the abiotic drivers of microcystins and their occurrence would assist in the implementation of targeted, cost-effective solutions to maintain safe drinking and recreational waters. Cyanobacteria and microcystins were measured by flow cytometry and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry in two interconnected reservoirs varying in age and management regimes, in southern Britain over a 12-month period. Microcystins were detected in both reservoirs, with significantly higher concentrations in the southern lake (maximum concentration >7 µg L−1). Elevated microcystin concentrations were not positively correlated with numbers of cyanobacterial cells, but multiple linear regression analysis suggested temperature and dissolved oxygen explained a significant amount of the variability in microcystin across both reservoirs. The presence of a managed fishery in one lake was associated with decreased microcystin levels, suggestive of top down control on cyanobacterial populations. This study supports the need to develop inclusive, multifactor holistic water management strategies to control cyanobacterial risks in freshwater bodies.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34444/

Source: Scopus

Cyanobacterial Abundance and Microcystin Profiles in Two Southern British Lakes: The Importance of Abiotic and Biotic Interactions.

Authors: Hartnell, D.M., Chapman, I.J., Taylor, N.G.H., Esteban, G.F., Turner, A.D. and Franklin, D.J.

Journal: Toxins (Basel)

Volume: 12

Issue: 8

eISSN: 2072-6651

DOI: 10.3390/toxins12080503

Abstract:

Freshwater cyanobacteria blooms represent a risk to ecological and human health through induction of anoxia and release of potent toxins; both conditions require water management to mitigate risks. Many cyanobacteria taxa may produce microcystins, a group of toxic cyclic heptapeptides. Understanding the relationships between the abiotic drivers of microcystins and their occurrence would assist in the implementation of targeted, cost-effective solutions to maintain safe drinking and recreational waters. Cyanobacteria and microcystins were measured by flow cytometry and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry in two interconnected reservoirs varying in age and management regimes, in southern Britain over a 12-month period. Microcystins were detected in both reservoirs, with significantly higher concentrations in the southern lake (maximum concentration >7 µg L-1). Elevated microcystin concentrations were not positively correlated with numbers of cyanobacterial cells, but multiple linear regression analysis suggested temperature and dissolved oxygen explained a significant amount of the variability in microcystin across both reservoirs. The presence of a managed fishery in one lake was associated with decreased microcystin levels, suggestive of top down control on cyanobacterial populations. This study supports the need to develop inclusive, multifactor holistic water management strategies to control cyanobacterial risks in freshwater bodies.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34444/

Source: PubMed

Cyanobacterial Abundance and Microcystin Profiles in Two Southern British Lakes: The Importance of Abiotic and Biotic Interactions

Authors: Hartnell, D.M., Chapman, I.J., Taylor, N.G.H., Esteban, G.F., Turner, A.D. and Franklin, D.J.

Journal: TOXINS

Volume: 12

Issue: 8

eISSN: 2072-6651

DOI: 10.3390/toxins12080503

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34444/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Cyanobacterial Abundance and Microcystin Profiles in Two Southern British Lakes: The Importance of Abiotic and Biotic Interactions.

Authors: Hartnell, D.M., Chapman, I.J., Taylor, N.G.H., Esteban, G.F., Turner, A.D. and Franklin, D.J.

Journal: Toxins

Volume: 12

Issue: 8

eISSN: 2072-6651

ISSN: 2072-6651

DOI: 10.3390/toxins12080503

Abstract:

Freshwater cyanobacteria blooms represent a risk to ecological and human health through induction of anoxia and release of potent toxins; both conditions require water management to mitigate risks. Many cyanobacteria taxa may produce microcystins, a group of toxic cyclic heptapeptides. Understanding the relationships between the abiotic drivers of microcystins and their occurrence would assist in the implementation of targeted, cost-effective solutions to maintain safe drinking and recreational waters. Cyanobacteria and microcystins were measured by flow cytometry and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry in two interconnected reservoirs varying in age and management regimes, in southern Britain over a 12-month period. Microcystins were detected in both reservoirs, with significantly higher concentrations in the southern lake (maximum concentration >7 µg L-1). Elevated microcystin concentrations were not positively correlated with numbers of cyanobacterial cells, but multiple linear regression analysis suggested temperature and dissolved oxygen explained a significant amount of the variability in microcystin across both reservoirs. The presence of a managed fishery in one lake was associated with decreased microcystin levels, suggestive of top down control on cyanobacterial populations. This study supports the need to develop inclusive, multifactor holistic water management strategies to control cyanobacterial risks in freshwater bodies.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34444/

Source: Europe PubMed Central