People living with dementia and their family carers’ adherence to home-based Tai Chi practice

Authors: Barrado-Martín, Y., Heward, M., Polman, R. and Nyman, S.R.

Journal: Dementia

Volume: 20

Issue: 5

Pages: 1586-1603

eISSN: 1741-2684

ISSN: 1471-3012

DOI: 10.1177/1471301220957758

Abstract:

Objectives: The aim of this study was to understand what influenced people living with dementia and their family carers’ adherence to the home-based component of a Tai Chi exercise intervention. Method: Dyads, of people living with dementia and their family carers, who participated in the intervention arm of the Tai Chi for people living with dementia trial, were invited to join weekly Tai Chi classes for 20 weeks and practice at home. Semi-structured dyadic home interviews were conducted on average after 16 weeks of classes. The views of 15 dyads with a range of home practice adherence were sought in semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analysed using an inductive thematic approach. Results: Most participants found time to practise Tai Chi at home and practised for 18 hours on average. Amongst the barriers to adherence were participants’ competing commitments and a booklet not sufficiently conveying the Tai Chi movements. Hence, a video or DVD was requested by participants. Facilitators of their adherence to the home-based component of the intervention were their enjoyment of the practice and the development of a habit, which was supported by their commitment to the study and their willingness to benefit from Tai Chi. Conclusion: Enjoyment and perceived benefits had a great impact on participants living with dementia and their carers’ adherence to home-based Tai Chi practice. However, difficulties to perceive the Tai Chi movements through images might be hindering sustained participation. Hence, alternative aids such as videos and DVDs should be explored to facilitate adherence.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34496/

Source: Scopus

People living with dementia and their family carers' adherence to home-based Tai Chi practice.

Authors: Barrado-Martín, Y., Heward, M., Polman, R. and Nyman, S.R.

Journal: Dementia (London)

Volume: 20

Issue: 5

Pages: 1586-1603

eISSN: 1741-2684

DOI: 10.1177/1471301220957758

Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to understand what influenced people living with dementia and their family carers' adherence to the home-based component of a Tai Chi exercise intervention. METHOD: Dyads, of people living with dementia and their family carers, who participated in the intervention arm of the Tai Chi for people living with dementia trial, were invited to join weekly Tai Chi classes for 20 weeks and practice at home. Semi-structured dyadic home interviews were conducted on average after 16 weeks of classes. The views of 15 dyads with a range of home practice adherence were sought in semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analysed using an inductive thematic approach. RESULTS: Most participants found time to practise Tai Chi at home and practised for 18 hours on average. Amongst the barriers to adherence were participants' competing commitments and a booklet not sufficiently conveying the Tai Chi movements. Hence, a video or DVD was requested by participants. Facilitators of their adherence to the home-based component of the intervention were their enjoyment of the practice and the development of a habit, which was supported by their commitment to the study and their willingness to benefit from Tai Chi. CONCLUSION: Enjoyment and perceived benefits had a great impact on participants living with dementia and their carers' adherence to home-based Tai Chi practice. However, difficulties to perceive the Tai Chi movements through images might be hindering sustained participation. Hence, alternative aids such as videos and DVDs should be explored to facilitate adherence.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34496/

Source: PubMed

People living with dementia and their family carers' adherence to home-based Tai Chi practice

Authors: Barrado-Martin, Y., Heward, M., Polman, R. and Nyman, S.R.

Journal: DEMENTIA-INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL RESEARCH AND PRACTICE

Volume: 20

Issue: 5

Pages: 1586-1603

eISSN: 1741-2684

ISSN: 1471-3012

DOI: 10.1177/1471301220957758

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34496/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

People living with dementia and their family carers’ adherence to home-based Tai Chi practice

Authors: Barrado-Martín, Y., Heward, M., Polman, R. and Nyman, S.R.

Journal: Dementia: the international journal of social research and practice

Publisher: SAGE

ISSN: 1471-3012

Abstract:

Objectives: The aim of this study was to understand what influenced people living with dementia and their family carers’ adherence to the home-based component of a Tai Chi exercise intervention.

Method: Dyads, of people living with dementia and their family carers, who participated in the intervention arm of the TAi ChI for people living with demenTia (TACIT) trial, were invited to join weekly Tai Chi classes for 20 weeks and practice at home. Semi-structured dyadic home-interviews were conducted on average after 16 weeks of classes. The views of 15 dyads with a range of home practice adherence were sought in semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analysed using an inductive thematic approach.

Results: Most participants found time to practise Tai Chi at home and practised for 17 hours on average. Amongst the barriers to adherence were participants’ competing commitments and a booklet not sufficiently conveying the Tai Chi movements. Hence, a video or DVD was requested by participants. Facilitators of their adherence to the home-based component of the intervention were their enjoyment of the practice and the development of a habit, which was supported by their commitment to the study and their willingness to benefit from Tai Chi.

Conclusion: Enjoyment and perceived benefits had a great impact on participants living with dementia and their carers’ adherence to home-based Tai Chi practice. However, difficulties to perceive the Tai Chi movements through images might be hindering sustained participation and hence alternative aids such as videos and DVDs should be explored to facilitate adherence.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34496/

Source: Manual

People living with dementia and their family carers' adherence to home-based Tai Chi practice.

Authors: Barrado-Martín, Y., Heward, M., Polman, R. and Nyman, S.R.

Journal: Dementia (London, England)

Volume: 20

Issue: 5

Pages: 1586-1603

eISSN: 1741-2684

ISSN: 1471-3012

DOI: 10.1177/1471301220957758

Abstract:

Objectives

The aim of this study was to understand what influenced people living with dementia and their family carers' adherence to the home-based component of a Tai Chi exercise intervention.

Method

Dyads, of people living with dementia and their family carers, who participated in the intervention arm of the Tai Chi for people living with dementia trial, were invited to join weekly Tai Chi classes for 20 weeks and practice at home. Semi-structured dyadic home interviews were conducted on average after 16 weeks of classes. The views of 15 dyads with a range of home practice adherence were sought in semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analysed using an inductive thematic approach.

Results

Most participants found time to practise Tai Chi at home and practised for 18 hours on average. Amongst the barriers to adherence were participants' competing commitments and a booklet not sufficiently conveying the Tai Chi movements. Hence, a video or DVD was requested by participants. Facilitators of their adherence to the home-based component of the intervention were their enjoyment of the practice and the development of a habit, which was supported by their commitment to the study and their willingness to benefit from Tai Chi.

Conclusion

Enjoyment and perceived benefits had a great impact on participants living with dementia and their carers' adherence to home-based Tai Chi practice. However, difficulties to perceive the Tai Chi movements through images might be hindering sustained participation. Hence, alternative aids such as videos and DVDs should be explored to facilitate adherence.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34496/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

People living with dementia and their family carers’ adherence to home-based Tai Chi practice

Authors: Barrado-Martín, Y., Heward, M., Polman, R.C.J. and Nyman, S.R.

Journal: Dementia: the international journal of social research and practice

Volume: 20

Issue: 5

Pages: 1586-1603

ISSN: 1471-3012

Abstract:

Objectives: The aim of this study was to understand what influenced people living with dementia and their family carers’ adherence to the home-based component of a Tai Chi exercise intervention. Method: Dyads, of people living with dementia and their family carers, who participated in the intervention arm of the TAi ChI for people living with demenTia (TACIT) trial, were invited to join weekly Tai Chi classes for 20 weeks and practice at home. Semi-structured dyadic home-interviews were conducted on average after 16 weeks of classes. The views of 15 dyads with a range of home practice adherence were sought in semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analysed using an inductive thematic approach. Results: Most participants found time to practise Tai Chi at home and practised for 17 hours on average. Amongst the barriers to adherence were participants’ competing commitments and a booklet not sufficiently conveying the Tai Chi movements. Hence, a video or DVD was requested by participants. Facilitators of their adherence to the home-based component of the intervention were their enjoyment of the practice and the development of a habit, which was supported by their commitment to the study and their willingness to benefit from Tai Chi. Conclusion: Enjoyment and perceived benefits had a great impact on participants living with dementia and their carers’ adherence to home-based Tai Chi practice. However, difficulties to perceive the Tai Chi movements through images might be hindering sustained participation and hence alternative aids such as videos and DVDs should be explored to facilitate adherence.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34496/

Source: BURO EPrints