Development of a methacrylate-terminated PLGA copolymer for potential use in craniomaxillofacial fracture plates

Authors: Upson, S.J., Partridge, S.W., Tcacencu, I., Fulton, D.A., Corbett, I., German, M.J. and Dalgarno, K.W.

Journal: Materials Science and Engineering C

Volume: 69

Pages: 470-477

ISSN: 0928-4931

DOI: 10.1016/j.msec.2016.06.012

Abstract:

We synthesised methacrylate-terminated PLGA (HT-PLGA, 85:15 LA:GA, 169 kDa), for potential use as an adhesively attached craniomaxillofacial fracture fixation plate. The in vitro degradation of molecular weight, pH and flexural modulus were measured over 6 weeks storage in PBS at 37 °C, with commercially available high (225 kDa, H-PLGA) and low (116 kDa, L-PLGA) molecular weight 85:15 PLGAs used as comparators. Molecular weights of the materials reduced over 6 weeks, HT-PLGA by 48%, H-PLGA by 23% and L-PLGA by 81%. HT-PLGA and H-PLGA exhibited a near constant pH (7.35) and had average flexural moduli in excess of 6 GPa when produced, similar to that of the mandible. After 1 week storage both exhibited a significant reduction in average modulus, however, from weeks 1–6 no further significant changes were observed, the average modulus never dropped significantly below 5.5 GPa. In contrast, the L-PLGA caused a pH drop to below 7.3 by week 6 and an average modulus drop to 0.6 from an initial 4.6 GPa. Cell culture using rat bone marrow stromal cells, revealed all materials were cytocompatible and exhibited no osteogenic potential. We conclude that our functionalised PLGA retains mechanical properties which are suitable for use in craniofacial fixation plates.

Source: Scopus

Development of a methacrylate-terminated PLGA copolymer for potential use in craniomaxillofacial fracture plates.

Authors: Upson, S.J., Partridge, S.W., Tcacencu, I., Fulton, D.A., Corbett, I., German, M.J. and Dalgarno, K.W.

Journal: Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl

Volume: 69

Pages: 470-477

eISSN: 1873-0191

DOI: 10.1016/j.msec.2016.06.012

Abstract:

We synthesised methacrylate-terminated PLGA (HT-PLGA, 85:15 LA:GA, 169kDa), for potential use as an adhesively attached craniomaxillofacial fracture fixation plate. The in vitro degradation of molecular weight, pH and flexural modulus were measured over 6weeks storage in PBS at 37°C, with commercially available high (225kDa, H-PLGA) and low (116kDa, L-PLGA) molecular weight 85:15 PLGAs used as comparators. Molecular weights of the materials reduced over 6weeks, HT-PLGA by 48%, H-PLGA by 23% and L-PLGA by 81%. HT-PLGA and H-PLGA exhibited a near constant pH (7.35) and had average flexural moduli in excess of 6GPa when produced, similar to that of the mandible. After 1week storage both exhibited a significant reduction in average modulus, however, from weeks 1-6 no further significant changes were observed, the average modulus never dropped significantly below 5.5GPa. In contrast, the L-PLGA caused a pH drop to below 7.3 by week 6 and an average modulus drop to 0.6 from an initial 4.6GPa. Cell culture using rat bone marrow stromal cells, revealed all materials were cytocompatible and exhibited no osteogenic potential. We conclude that our functionalised PLGA retains mechanical properties which are suitable for use in craniofacial fixation plates.

Source: PubMed

Development of a methacrylate-terminated PLGA copolymer for potential use in craniomaxillofacial fracture plates

Authors: Upson, S., Partridge, S., Fulton, D., Tcacencu, I., Corbitt, I., German, M. and Dalgarno, K.

Journal: Materials Science and Engineering C: Materials for Biological Applications

Volume: 69

Pages: 470-477

Publisher: Elsevier

ISSN: 0928-4931

Abstract:

Abstract We synthesised methacrylate-terminated PLGA (HT-PLGA, 85:15 LA:GA, 169 kDa), for potential use as an adhesively attached craniomaxillofacial fracture fixation plate. The in vitro degradation of molecular weight, pH and flexural modulus were measured over 6 weeks storage in PBS at 37 °C, with commercially available high (225 kDa, H-PLGA) and low (116 kDa, L-PLGA) molecular weight 85:15 PLGAs used as comparators. Molecular weights of the materials reduced over 6 weeks, HT-PLGA by 48%, H-PLGA by 23% and L-PLGA by 81%. HT-PLGA and H-PLGA exhibited a near constant pH (7.35) and had average flexural moduli in excess of 6 GPa when produced, similar to that of the mandible. After 1 week storage both exhibited a significant reduction in average modulus, however, from weeks 1–6 no further significant changes were observed, the average modulus never dropped significantly below 5.5 GPa. In contrast, the L-PLGA caused a pH drop to below 7.3 by week 6 and an average modulus drop to 0.6 from an initial 4.6 GPa. Cell culture using rat bone marrow stromal cells, revealed all materials were cytocompatible and exhibited no osteogenic potential. We conclude that our functionalised PLGA retains mechanical properties which are suitable for use in craniofacial fixation plates.

Source: Manual

Development of a methacrylate-terminated PLGA copolymer for potential use in craniomaxillofacial fracture plates.

Authors: Upson, S.J., Partridge, S.W., Tcacencu, I., Fulton, D.A., Corbett, I., German, M.J. and Dalgarno, K.W.

Journal: Materials science & engineering. C, Materials for biological applications

Volume: 69

Pages: 470-477

eISSN: 1873-0191

ISSN: 0928-4931

DOI: 10.1016/j.msec.2016.06.012

Abstract:

We synthesised methacrylate-terminated PLGA (HT-PLGA, 85:15 LA:GA, 169kDa), for potential use as an adhesively attached craniomaxillofacial fracture fixation plate. The in vitro degradation of molecular weight, pH and flexural modulus were measured over 6weeks storage in PBS at 37°C, with commercially available high (225kDa, H-PLGA) and low (116kDa, L-PLGA) molecular weight 85:15 PLGAs used as comparators. Molecular weights of the materials reduced over 6weeks, HT-PLGA by 48%, H-PLGA by 23% and L-PLGA by 81%. HT-PLGA and H-PLGA exhibited a near constant pH (7.35) and had average flexural moduli in excess of 6GPa when produced, similar to that of the mandible. After 1week storage both exhibited a significant reduction in average modulus, however, from weeks 1-6 no further significant changes were observed, the average modulus never dropped significantly below 5.5GPa. In contrast, the L-PLGA caused a pH drop to below 7.3 by week 6 and an average modulus drop to 0.6 from an initial 4.6GPa. Cell culture using rat bone marrow stromal cells, revealed all materials were cytocompatible and exhibited no osteogenic potential. We conclude that our functionalised PLGA retains mechanical properties which are suitable for use in craniofacial fixation plates.

Source: Europe PubMed Central