Transitions from healthcare to self-care: a qualitative study of falls service practitioners' views on self-management

Authors: Killingback, C., Thompson, M.A., Chipperfield, S., Clark, C. and Williams, J.

Journal: Disability and Rehabilitation

Volume: 44

Issue: 12

Pages: 2683-2690

eISSN: 1464-5165

ISSN: 0963-8288

DOI: 10.1080/09638288.2020.1849423

Abstract:

Purpose: The aim of this study was to understand the views of falls service practitioners regarding: their role in supporting self-management of falls prevention; and a transition pathway from National Health Service (NHS) exercise-based falls interventions to community-run exercise programmes. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with physiotherapists, nurses, and rehabilitation assistants (n = 8) who worked in an NHS falls service. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: Certain aspects of supporting patients in self-management were deemed to be within or beyond the scope of falls service practitioners. Challenges in supporting transition to community-run programmes included: practitioner awareness and buy in; patient buy in; and patient suitability/programme availability. Conclusion: Practitioners sought to be patient-centred as a means to engage patients in self-management of falls prevention exercises. Time-limited intervention periods and waiting list pressures were barriers to the promotion of long-term self-management approaches. A disconnect between falls service interventions and community-run programmes hindered willing practitioners from supporting patients in transitioning. Unless falls risk and prevention is seen by healthcare providers as a long-term condition which requires person-centred support from practitioners to develop self-management approaches, then falls services may only be able to offer short-term measures which are potentially not long lasting.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Falls rehabilitation practitioners need to take a person-centred approach to engage patients in self-management of falls prevention exercises. Providing information and signposting to exercise opportunities such as community-run programmes following falls service interventions should be viewed as being within the scope of the role of falls service practitioners. Rehabilitation practitioners should consider viewing falls risk as a long-term condition, to promote longer-term behavioural change approaches to ongoing engagement of exercise for falls prevention.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34867/

Source: Scopus

Transitions from healthcare to self-care: a qualitative study of falls service practitioners' views on self-management.

Authors: Killingback, C., Thompson, M.A., Chipperfield, S., Clark, C. and Williams, J.

Journal: Disabil Rehabil

Volume: 44

Issue: 12

Pages: 2683-2690

eISSN: 1464-5165

DOI: 10.1080/09638288.2020.1849423

Abstract:

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to understand the views of falls service practitioners regarding: their role in supporting self-management of falls prevention; and a transition pathway from National Health Service (NHS) exercise-based falls interventions to community-run exercise programmes. METHOD: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with physiotherapists, nurses, and rehabilitation assistants (n = 8) who worked in an NHS falls service. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Certain aspects of supporting patients in self-management were deemed to be within or beyond the scope of falls service practitioners. Challenges in supporting transition to community-run programmes included: practitioner awareness and buy in; patient buy in; and patient suitability/programme availability. CONCLUSION: Practitioners sought to be patient-centred as a means to engage patients in self-management of falls prevention exercises. Time-limited intervention periods and waiting list pressures were barriers to the promotion of long-term self-management approaches. A disconnect between falls service interventions and community-run programmes hindered willing practitioners from supporting patients in transitioning. Unless falls risk and prevention is seen by healthcare providers as a long-term condition which requires person-centred support from practitioners to develop self-management approaches, then falls services may only be able to offer short-term measures which are potentially not long lasting.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATIONFalls rehabilitation practitioners need to take a person-centred approach to engage patients in self-management of falls prevention exercises.Providing information and signposting to exercise opportunities such as community-run programmes following falls service interventions should be viewed as being within the scope of the role of falls service practitioners.Rehabilitation practitioners should consider viewing falls risk as a long-term condition, to promote longer-term behavioural change approaches to ongoing engagement of exercise for falls prevention.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34867/

Source: PubMed

Transitions from healthcare to self-care: a qualitative study of falls service practitioners' views on self-management

Authors: Killingback, C., Thompson, M.A., Chipperfield, S., Clark, C. and Williams, J.

Journal: DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION

Volume: 44

Issue: 12

Pages: 2683-2690

eISSN: 1464-5165

ISSN: 0963-8288

DOI: 10.1080/09638288.2020.1849423

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34867/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Transitions from healthcare to self-care: a qualitative study of falls service practitioners' views on self-management.

Authors: Killingback, C., Thompson, M.A., Chipperfield, S., Clark, C. and Williams, J.

Journal: Disabil Rehabil

Pages: 1-8

eISSN: 1464-5165

DOI: 10.1080/09638288.2020.1849423

Abstract:

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to understand the views of falls service practitioners regarding: their role in supporting self-management of falls prevention; and a transition pathway from National Health Service (NHS) exercise-based falls interventions to community-run exercise programmes. METHOD: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with physiotherapists, nurses, and rehabilitation assistants (n = 8) who worked in an NHS falls service. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Certain aspects of supporting patients in self-management were deemed to be within or beyond the scope of falls service practitioners. Challenges in supporting transition to community-run programmes included: practitioner awareness and buy in; patient buy in; and patient suitability/programme availability. CONCLUSION: Practitioners sought to be patient-centred as a means to engage patients in self-management of falls prevention exercises. Time-limited intervention periods and waiting list pressures were barriers to the promotion of long-term self-management approaches. A disconnect between falls service interventions and community-run programmes hindered willing practitioners from supporting patients in transitioning. Unless falls risk and prevention is seen by healthcare providers as a long-term condition which requires person-centred support from practitioners to develop self-management approaches, then falls services may only be able to offer short-term measures which are potentially not long lasting. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Falls rehabilitation practitioners need to take a person-centred approach to engage patients in self-management of falls prevention exercises. Providing information and signposting to exercise opportunities such as community-run programmes following falls service interventions should be viewed as being within the scope of the role of falls service practitioners. Rehabilitation practitioners should consider viewing falls risk as a long-term condition, to promote longer-term behavioural change approaches to ongoing engagement of exercise for falls prevention.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34867/

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Jonathan Williams

Transitions from healthcare to self-care: a qualitative study of falls service practitioners' views on self-management.

Authors: Killingback, C., Thompson, M.A., Chipperfield, S., Clark, C. and Williams, J.

Journal: Disability and rehabilitation

Volume: 44

Issue: 12

Pages: 2683-2690

eISSN: 1464-5165

ISSN: 0963-8288

DOI: 10.1080/09638288.2020.1849423

Abstract:

Purpose

The aim of this study was to understand the views of falls service practitioners regarding: their role in supporting self-management of falls prevention; and a transition pathway from National Health Service (NHS) exercise-based falls interventions to community-run exercise programmes.

Method

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with physiotherapists, nurses, and rehabilitation assistants (n = 8) who worked in an NHS falls service. Data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Results

Certain aspects of supporting patients in self-management were deemed to be within or beyond the scope of falls service practitioners. Challenges in supporting transition to community-run programmes included: practitioner awareness and buy in; patient buy in; and patient suitability/programme availability.

Conclusion

Practitioners sought to be patient-centred as a means to engage patients in self-management of falls prevention exercises. Time-limited intervention periods and waiting list pressures were barriers to the promotion of long-term self-management approaches. A disconnect between falls service interventions and community-run programmes hindered willing practitioners from supporting patients in transitioning. Unless falls risk and prevention is seen by healthcare providers as a long-term condition which requires person-centred support from practitioners to develop self-management approaches, then falls services may only be able to offer short-term measures which are potentially not long lasting.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATIONFalls rehabilitation practitioners need to take a person-centred approach to engage patients in self-management of falls prevention exercises.Providing information and signposting to exercise opportunities such as community-run programmes following falls service interventions should be viewed as being within the scope of the role of falls service practitioners.Rehabilitation practitioners should consider viewing falls risk as a long-term condition, to promote longer-term behavioural change approaches to ongoing engagement of exercise for falls prevention.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34867/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Transitions from healthcare to self-care: a qualitative study of falls service practitioners' views on self-management.

Authors: Killingback, C., Thompson, M.A., Chipperfield, S., Clark, C.J. and Williams, J.M.

Journal: Disability and Rehabilitation

Volume: 44

Issue: 12

Pages: 2683-2690

ISSN: 0963-8288

Abstract:

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to understand the views of falls service practitioners regarding: their role in supporting self-management of falls prevention; and a transition pathway from National Health Service (NHS) exercise-based falls interventions to community-run exercise programmes. METHOD: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with physiotherapists, nurses, and rehabilitation assistants (n = 8) who worked in an NHS falls service. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Certain aspects of supporting patients in self-management were deemed to be within or beyond the scope of falls service practitioners. Challenges in supporting transition to community-run programmes included: practitioner awareness and buy in; patient buy in; and patient suitability/programme availability. CONCLUSION: Practitioners sought to be patient-centred as a means to engage patients in self-management of falls prevention exercises. Time-limited intervention periods and waiting list pressures were barriers to the promotion of long-term self-management approaches. A disconnect between falls service interventions and community-run programmes hindered willing practitioners from supporting patients in transitioning. Unless falls risk and prevention is seen by healthcare providers as a long-term condition which requires person-centred support from practitioners to develop self-management approaches, then falls services may only be able to offer short-term measures which are potentially not long lasting. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Falls rehabilitation practitioners need to take a person-centred approach to engage patients in self-management of falls prevention exercises. Providing information and signposting to exercise opportunities such as community-run programmes following falls service interventions should be viewed as being within the scope of the role of falls service practitioners. Rehabilitation practitioners should consider viewing falls risk as a long-term condition, to promote longer-term behavioural change approaches to ongoing engagement of exercise for falls prevention.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34867/

Source: BURO EPrints