Physiotherapists’ views on their role in self-management approaches: A qualitative systematic review

Authors: Killingback, C., Thompson, M., Chipperfield, S., Clark, C. and Williams, J.

Journal: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice

eISSN: 1532-5040

ISSN: 0959-3985

DOI: 10.1080/09593985.2021.1911011

Abstract:

Background: Self-management has been an increasingly important aspect of helping people manage their long-term conditions. The aim of this qualitative review was to synthesize the views of physiotherapists concerning their delivery of a self-management approach. Method: A systematic search was conducted on six electronic bibliographic databases to identify relevant primary studies. Studies were assessed for quality and data extracted. Qualitative data were analyzed using thematic synthesis. A total of 1189 studies were identified and screened. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. Results: Findings suggest that for self-management approaches to work, physio-therapists believe that patients need to actively participate. Boundaries on who is the expert were blurred at times with some physiotherapists struggling to relinquish control. High-quality patient–therapist relationships are required to build trust in order to support patients in the self-management of their long-term conditions. It is also important to consider the competing paradigms in which a service is delivered as this may facilitate or hinder self-management. Seeing patients as people is integral to supporting self-management approaches. Conclusion: Physiotherapists are well placed to support self-management but there is still a need for a cultural and paradigmatic shift in the physiotherapy profession and in some environments, this shift as yet is to be realized.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35402/

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36775/

Source: Scopus

Physiotherapists' views on their role in self-management approaches: A qualitative systematic review.

Authors: Killingback, C., Thompson, M., Chipperfield, S., Clark, C. and Williams, J.

Journal: Physiother Theory Pract

Pages: 1-15

eISSN: 1532-5040

DOI: 10.1080/09593985.2021.1911011

Abstract:

Background: Self-management has been an increasingly important aspect of helping people manage their long-term conditions. The aim of this qualitative review was to synthesize the views of physiotherapists concerning their delivery of a self-management approach.Method: A systematic search was conducted on six electronic bibliographic databases to identify relevant primary studies. Studies were assessed for quality and data extracted. Qualitative data were analyzed using thematic synthesis. A total of 1189 studies were identified and screened. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria.Results: Findings suggest that for self-management approaches to work, physio-therapists believe that patients need to actively participate. Boundaries on who is the expert were blurred at times with some physiotherapists struggling to relinquish control. High-quality patient-therapist relationships are required to build trust in order to support patients in the self-management of their long-term conditions. It is also important to consider the competing paradigms in which a service is delivered as this may facilitate or hinder self-management. Seeing patients as people is integral to supporting self-management approaches.Conclusion: Physiotherapists are well placed to support self-management but there is still a need for a cultural and paradigmatic shift in the physiotherapy profession and in some environments, this shift as yet is to be realized.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35402/

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36775/

Source: PubMed

Physiotherapists' views on their role in self-management approaches: A qualitative systematic review

Authors: Killingback, C., Thompson, M., Chipperfield, S., Clark, C. and Williams, J.

Journal: PHYSIOTHERAPY THEORY AND PRACTICE

eISSN: 1532-5040

ISSN: 0959-3985

DOI: 10.1080/09593985.2021.1911011

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35402/

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36775/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Physiotherapists’ views on their role in self-management approaches: A qualitative systematic review

Authors: Killingback, C., Thompson, M., Chipperfield, S., Clark, C. and Williams, J.

Journal: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice

eISSN: 1532-5040

ISSN: 0959-3985

DOI: 10.1080/09593985.2021.1911011

Abstract:

Background: Self-management has been an increasingly important aspect of helping people manage their long-term conditions. The aim of this qualitative review was to synthesize the views of physiotherapists concerning their delivery of a self-management approach. Method: A systematic search was conducted on six electronic bibliographic databases to identify relevant primary studies. Studies were assessed for quality and data extracted. Qualitative data were analyzed using thematic synthesis. A total of 1189 studies were identified and screened. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. Results: Findings suggest that for self-management approaches to work, physio-therapists believe that patients need to actively participate. Boundaries on who is the expert were blurred at times with some physiotherapists struggling to relinquish control. High-quality patient–therapist relationships are required to build trust in order to support patients in the self-management of their long-term conditions. It is also important to consider the competing paradigms in which a service is delivered as this may facilitate or hinder self-management. Seeing patients as people is integral to supporting self-management approaches. Conclusion: Physiotherapists are well placed to support self-management but there is still a need for a cultural and paradigmatic shift in the physiotherapy profession and in some environments, this shift as yet is to be realized.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35402/

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36775/

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Jonathan Williams

Physiotherapists' views on their role in self-management approaches: A qualitative systematic review.

Authors: Killingback, C., Thompson, M., Chipperfield, S., Clark, C. and Williams, J.

Journal: Physiotherapy theory and practice

Pages: 1-15

eISSN: 1532-5040

ISSN: 0959-3985

DOI: 10.1080/09593985.2021.1911011

Abstract:

Background: Self-management has been an increasingly important aspect of helping people manage their long-term conditions. The aim of this qualitative review was to synthesize the views of physiotherapists concerning their delivery of a self-management approach.Method: A systematic search was conducted on six electronic bibliographic databases to identify relevant primary studies. Studies were assessed for quality and data extracted. Qualitative data were analyzed using thematic synthesis. A total of 1189 studies were identified and screened. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria.Results: Findings suggest that for self-management approaches to work, physio-therapists believe that patients need to actively participate. Boundaries on who is the expert were blurred at times with some physiotherapists struggling to relinquish control. High-quality patient-therapist relationships are required to build trust in order to support patients in the self-management of their long-term conditions. It is also important to consider the competing paradigms in which a service is delivered as this may facilitate or hinder self-management. Seeing patients as people is integral to supporting self-management approaches.Conclusion: Physiotherapists are well placed to support self-management but there is still a need for a cultural and paradigmatic shift in the physiotherapy profession and in some environments, this shift as yet is to be realized.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35402/

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36775/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Physiotherapists’ views on their role in self-management approaches: A qualitative systematic review

Authors: Killingback, C., Thompson, M., Chipperfield, S., Clark, C. and Williams, J.

Journal: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice

Pages: 1-15

ISSN: 0959-3985

Abstract:

Background: Self-management has been an increasingly important aspect of helping people manage their long-term conditions. The aim of this qualitative review was to synthesize the views of physiotherapists concerning their delivery of a self-management approach. Method: A systematic search was conducted on six electronic bibliographic databases to identify relevant primary studies. Studies were assessed for quality and data extracted. Qualitative data were analyzed using thematic synthesis. A total of 1189 studies were identified and screened. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. Results: Findings suggest that for self-management approaches to work, physio-therapists believe that patients need to actively participate. Boundaries on who is the expert were blurred at times with some physiotherapists struggling to relinquish control. High-quality patient–therapist relationships are required to build trust in order to support patients in the self-management of their long-term conditions. It is also important to consider the competing paradigms in which a service is delivered as this may facilitate or hinder self-management. Seeing patients as people is integral to supporting self-management approaches. Conclusion: Physiotherapists are well placed to support self-management but there is still a need for a cultural and paradigmatic shift in the physiotherapy profession and in some environments, this shift as yet is to be realized.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35402/

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36775/

Source: BURO EPrints

Physiotherapists' views on their role in self-management approaches: A qualitative systematic review.

Authors: Killingback, C., Thompson, M., Chipperfield, S., Clark, C.J. and Williams, J.M.

Journal: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice

Pages: 1-15

ISSN: 0959-3985

Abstract:

Background: Self-management has been an increasingly important aspect of helping people manage their long-term conditions. The aim of this qualitative review was to synthesize the views of physiotherapists concerning their delivery of a self-management approach.Method: A systematic search was conducted on six electronic bibliographic databases to identify relevant primary studies. Studies were assessed for quality and data extracted. Qualitative data were analyzed using thematic synthesis. A total of 1189 studies were identified and screened. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria.Results: Findings suggest that for self-management approaches to work, physio-therapists believe that patients need to actively participate. Boundaries on who is the expert were blurred at times with some physiotherapists struggling to relinquish control. High-quality patient-therapist relationships are required to build trust in order to support patients in the self-management of their long-term conditions. It is also important to consider the competing paradigms in which a service is delivered as this may facilitate or hinder self-management. Seeing patients as people is integral to supporting self-management approaches.Conclusion: Physiotherapists are well placed to support self-management but there is still a need for a cultural and paradigmatic shift in the physiotherapy profession and in some environments, this shift as yet is to be realized.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35402/

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36775/

Source: BURO EPrints