When two fields collide: Identifying "super-recognisers" for neuropsychological and forensic face recognition research.

Authors: Bate, S., Portch, E. and Mestry, N.

Journal: Q J Exp Psychol (Hove)

Pages: 17470218211027695

eISSN: 1747-0226

DOI: 10.1177/17470218211027695

Abstract:

In the last decade, a novel individual differences approach has emerged across the face recognition literature. While the field has long been concerned with prosopagnosia (the inability to recognise facial identity), it has more recently become clear that there are vast differences in face recognition ability within the typical population. "Super-recognisers" are those individuals purported to reside at the very top of this spectrum. On one hand, these people are of interest to cognitive neuropsychologists who are motivated to explore the commonality of the face recognition continuum, whereas on the other hand, researchers from the forensic face matching field evaluate the implementation of super-recognisers into real-world police and security settings. These two rather different approaches have led to discrepancies in the definition of super-recognisers, and perhaps more fundamentally, the approach to identifying them, resulting in a lack of consistency that prohibits theoretical progress. Here, we review the protocols used in published work to identify super-recognisers, and propose a common definition and screening recommendations that can be adhered to across fields.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35687/

Source: PubMed

When Two Fields Collide: Identifying "Super-Recognisers" for Neuropsychological and Forensic Face Recognition Research.

Authors: Bate, S., Portch, E. and Mestry, N.

Journal: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

DOI: 10.1177/17470218211027695

Abstract:

In the last decade, a novel individual differences approach has emerged across the face recognition literature. While the field has long been concerned with prosopagnosia (the inability to recognise facial identity), it has more recently become clear that there are vast differences in face recognition ability within the typical population. "Super-recognisers" are those individuals purported to reside at the very top of this spectrum. On the one hand, these people are of interest to cognitive neuropsychologists who are motivated to explore the commonality of the face recognition continuum, whereas researchers from the forensic face matching field evaluate the implementation of super-recognisers into real-world police and security settings. These two rather different approaches have led to discrepancies in the definition of super-recognisers, and perhaps more fundamentally, the approach to identifying them, resulting in a lack of consistency that prohibits theoretical progress. Here, we review the protocols used in published work to identify super-recognisers, and propose a common definition and screening recommendations that can be adhered to across fields.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35687/

Source: Manual

When two fields collide: Identifying "super-recognisers" for neuropsychological and forensic face recognition research.

Authors: Bate, S., Portch, E. and Mestry, N.

Journal: Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006)

Pages: 17470218211027695

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

DOI: 10.1177/17470218211027695

Abstract:

In the last decade, a novel individual differences approach has emerged across the face recognition literature. While the field has long been concerned with prosopagnosia (the inability to recognise facial identity), it has more recently become clear that there are vast differences in face recognition ability within the typical population. "Super-recognisers" are those individuals purported to reside at the very top of this spectrum. On one hand, these people are of interest to cognitive neuropsychologists who are motivated to explore the commonality of the face recognition continuum, whereas on the other hand, researchers from the forensic face matching field evaluate the implementation of super-recognisers into real-world police and security settings. These two rather different approaches have led to discrepancies in the definition of super-recognisers, and perhaps more fundamentally, the approach to identifying them, resulting in a lack of consistency that prohibits theoretical progress. Here, we review the protocols used in published work to identify super-recognisers, and propose a common definition and screening recommendations that can be adhered to across fields.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35687/

Source: Europe PubMed Central