Natalie Mestry

Dr Natalie Mestry

  • 01202 965625
  • nmestry at bournemouth dot ac dot uk
  • Lecturer (Academic) in Psychology
  • Poole House P328, Talbot Campus, Fern Barrow, Poole, BH12 5BB
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Biography

I am a cognitive researcher with expertise in face processing and visual search. I graduated with a BSc (Hons) in Psychology from the University of Southampton in 2008. I was awarded a 1 + 3 ESRC studentship to continue my studies at the University of Southampton and completed my MSc Research Methods in Psychology in 2009 and my PhD in 2013. The research conducted during my PhD investigated sources of configural face processing. I was a Research Fellow within the Centre for Vision and Cognition at the University of Southampton from 2013 – 2017 working on projects about face processing and visual search. I was also a Teaching Fellow for the department from 2015 -2017. I joined Bournemouth University in 2017 as a Lecturer.

Research

My main research interests are in the field of vision and cognition, specifically face processing and visual search. My recent research has examined the dual-target cost, guidance and capacity in visual search for multiple unfamiliar faces using eye-tracking.

Favourites

  • Mestry, N., Menneer, T., Cave, K.R., Godwin, H.J. and Donnelly, N., 2017. Dual-target cost in visual search for multiple unfamiliar faces. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 43 (8), 1504-1519.

Journal Articles

  • Mestry, N., Menneer, T., Cave, K.R., Godwin, H.J. and Donnelly, N., 2017. Dual-target cost in visual search for multiple unfamiliar faces. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 43 (8), 1504-1519.
  • Donnelly, N., Harland, B., Mestry, N., Thompson, N., Trawiński, T. and Liversedge, S.P., 2017. The influence of pupil alignment on spectator address in Manet's portraiture. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, 11 (2), 167-178.
  • Mestry, N., Menneer, T., Wenger, M.J., Benikos, N., McCarthy, R.A. and Donnelly, N., 2015. The Role of Configurality in the Thatcher Illusion: An ERP Study. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 22 (2), 445-452.
  • Mestry, N., Menneer, T., Wenger, M.J. and Donnelly, N., 2012. Identifying sources of configurality in three face processing tasks. Frontiers in Psychology, 3 (NOV).
  • Mestry, N., Donnelly, N., Menneer, T. and McCarthy, R.A., 2012. Discriminating Thatcherised from typical faces in a case of prosopagnosia. Neuropsychologia, 50 (14), 3410-3418.

Internet Publications

Others

  • Donnelly, N., Hillstrom, A. and Mestry, N., 2017. Just another face in the crowd – what makes spotting unfamiliar faces difficult?. Centre for Research and Evidence on Security Threats. Published.

Profile of Teaching PG

  • Psychology Project Supervision

Profile of Teaching UG

  • Face Recognition and its Disorders (FRAID)
  • Psychology Project Supervision
  • Academic Advisor
  • Experimental Methods and Statistical Analysis (EMSA) 2a

Grants

  • We’re in this together: Using evidence-based visual perception to enhance crowd resilience.” (Defence and Security Accelerator, 01 Sep 2018). Awarded
  • We’re in this together: Using evidence-based visual perception research to enhance the crowd’s ability to detect threats in the environment. (Defence and Security Accelerator, 15 Nov 2017). Completed
  • Costs in Search for More Than One Face and Detection of Repeating Faces (Experimental Psychology Society, 01 Sep 2017). In Progress

Internal Responsibilities

  • Impact Champion for UoA 4, Impact Committee
  • Head of External Engagement, Department of Psychology

Public Engagement & Outreach Activities

  • Work Experience in Psychology. I coordinate and supervise work experience visits to the department for sixth form students.
  • Summer Breaks 2018. I delivered a psychology subject taster session for Y12 students visiting the university as part of the 'Summer Breaks' Widening participation initiative where students get a taste of the university experience over a few days.
  • Eye tracking as a window to the mind, Festival of Learning 2018. We explained how researchers use eye movements to understand the mental processes behind tasks. Visitors took part in a Where's Wally search task while their eye movements were tracked. The display was gaze contingent so that the audience could see the eye movements during the task. We explained the retina and why it is necessary to move our eyes to bring new information into high acuity vision and that eye movements reflect the moment to moment cognitive processes that we engage in when we undertake a task.

Conference Presentations

  • Vision Sciences Society Conference, The influence of training with one or two faces on dual-target face search, 18 May 2018, St Pete Beach, Florida
  • Vision Sciences Society Conference, The Effects of Familiarity and Orientation when Correcting Spatially Distorted Faces, 19 May 2017, St Pete Beach, FL

Qualifications

  • PhD in The Nature of Configural Processing (University of Southampton, 2013)
  • MSc in Research Methods in Psychology (University of Southampton, 2009)
  • BSc (Hons) in Psychology (University of Southampton, 2008)

Memberships

  • Experimental Psychology Society, Member (2015-),
  • Higher Education Academy, Fellow (2016-),
  • Vision Sciences Society, Member (2009-),
The data on this page was last updated at 04:04 on December 15, 2018.