How does the use of humour in the UK ambulance service affect a clinician's well-being?

Authors: Lancaster, C. and Phillips, P.

Journal: Br Paramed J

Volume: 6

Issue: 2

Pages: 26-33

eISSN: 1478-4726

DOI: 10.29045/14784726.2021.9.6.2.26

Abstract:

Introduction: Paramedics and ambulance staff face many different stresses in today's UK ambulance service, with many having reported an effect on their well-being and mental health. Humour is widely used by staff as a coping mechanism, but little is known about this topic. This literature review aims to find out how humour is used and how it can affect clinicians' well-being. Methods: A total of nine medical databases were searched for relevant literature - Cochrane, Scopus, CINAHL Complete, Science Direct, Medline Complete, Complementary Index, Academic Search Complete, Emerald Insight and Supplemental Index. Articles were included if they were published in 2005 or after, if they were a UK-based original study and if they studied humour in relation to paramedics' well-being. Results: After limiters were applied, a total of 26 articles were found. Only four articles met all the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Two of the articles studied humour directly, whereas two found humour as a result of studying the resilience and strategies used to cope with the stresses of ambulance work. Four key themes were identified: different types of humour, the source and boundaries of humour, offloading and camaraderie. Conclusion: This review of the literature found that many in the ambulance community view their use and expression of humour as a positive coping strategy that helps them to relieve the stresses of the job. Further research is needed to investigate any negative effects that humour has on a clinician's well-being and larger studies are needed to give a better representation of the ambulance community.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36065/

Source: PubMed

How does the use of humour in the UK ambulance service affect a clinician's well-being?

Authors: Lancaster, C. and Phillips, P.

Journal: Br Paramed J

Volume: 6

Issue: 2

Pages: 26-33

eISSN: 1478-4726

DOI: 10.29045/14784726.2021.9.6.2.26

Abstract:

Introduction: Paramedics and ambulance staff face many different stresses in today's UK ambulance service, with many having reported an effect on their well-being and mental health. Humour is widely used by staff as a coping mechanism, but little is known about this topic. This literature review aims to find out how humour is used and how it can affect clinicians' well-being. Methods: A total of nine medical databases were searched for relevant literature - Cochrane, Scopus, CINAHL Complete, Science Direct, Medline Complete, Complementary Index, Academic Search Complete, Emerald Insight and Supplemental Index. Articles were included if they were published in 2005 or after, if they were a UK-based original study and if they studied humour in relation to paramedics' well-being. Results: After limiters were applied, a total of 26 articles were found. Only four articles met all the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Two of the articles studied humour directly, whereas two found humour as a result of studying the resilience and strategies used to cope with the stresses of ambulance work. Four key themes were identified: different types of humour, the source and boundaries of humour, offloading and camaraderie. Conclusion: This review of the literature found that many in the ambulance community view their use and expression of humour as a positive coping strategy that helps them to relieve the stresses of the job. Further research is needed to investigate any negative effects that humour has on a clinician's well-being and larger studies are needed to give a better representation of the ambulance community.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36065/

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Peter Phillips

How does the use of humour in the UK ambulance service affect a clinician's well-being?

Authors: Lancaster, C. and Phillips, P.

Journal: British paramedic journal

Volume: 6

Issue: 2

Pages: 26-33

eISSN: 1478-4726

DOI: 10.29045/14784726.2021.9.6.2.26

Abstract:

Introduction

Paramedics and ambulance staff face many different stresses in today's UK ambulance service, with many having reported an effect on their well-being and mental health. Humour is widely used by staff as a coping mechanism, but little is known about this topic. This literature review aims to find out how humour is used and how it can affect clinicians' well-being.

Methods

A total of nine medical databases were searched for relevant literature - Cochrane, Scopus, CINAHL Complete, Science Direct, Medline Complete, Complementary Index, Academic Search Complete, Emerald Insight and Supplemental Index. Articles were included if they were published in 2005 or after, if they were a UK-based original study and if they studied humour in relation to paramedics' well-being.

Results

After limiters were applied, a total of 26 articles were found. Only four articles met all the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Two of the articles studied humour directly, whereas two found humour as a result of studying the resilience and strategies used to cope with the stresses of ambulance work. Four key themes were identified: different types of humour, the source and boundaries of humour, offloading and camaraderie.

Conclusion

This review of the literature found that many in the ambulance community view their use and expression of humour as a positive coping strategy that helps them to relieve the stresses of the job. Further research is needed to investigate any negative effects that humour has on a clinician's well-being and larger studies are needed to give a better representation of the ambulance community.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36065/

Source: Europe PubMed Central