How do hospice nurses prepare to give end-of-life care? A grounded theory study of nurses in one UK hospice

Authors: Griffith, S. and Gelling, L.

Journal: International Journal of Palliative Nursing

Volume: 27

Issue: 7

Pages: 334-350

eISSN: 2052-286X

ISSN: 1357-6321

DOI: 10.12968/ijpn.2021.27.7.334

Abstract:

Background: Literature for preparing hospice nurses to deliver end-of-life care is sparse. Aim: To investigate how nurses in one UK hospice prepared to deliver end-of-life care in their role. Methods: A classic grounded theory approach was used to investigate the experiences of 22 registered nurses in one UK hospice, to discover how they prepared for their role. A total of 17 individual interviews and one focus group were conducted. Constant comparison of data and member checking were performed to establish validity. Findings: Findings were synthesised into five categories: the 'shared ideal', feeling good at the job, making a difference, experience/exposure to hospice work and the importance of role models.The shared ideal formed the core category, which explained how hospice nurses feel a sense of 'fit' with their work. Conclusion: The feeling of a nurse feeling well-suited to the work and that there the work was a good 'fit' for them was identified as a core element to nurses' feelings of preparedness to provide end-of-life care.

Source: Scopus

How do hospice nurses prepare to give end-of-life care? A grounded theory study of nurses in one UK hospice.

Authors: Griffith, S. and Gelling, L.

Journal: Int J Palliat Nurs

Volume: 27

Issue: 7

Pages: 334-350

eISSN: 2052-286X

DOI: 10.12968/ijpn.2021.27.7.334

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Literature for preparing hospice nurses to deliver end-of-life care is sparse. AIM: To investigate how nurses in one UK hospice prepared to deliver end-of-life care in their role. METHODS: A classic grounded theory approach was used to investigate the experiences of 22 registered nurses in one UK hospice, to discover how they prepared for their role. A total of 17 individual interviews and one focus group were conducted. Constant comparison of data and member checking were performed to establish validity. FINDINGS: Findings were synthesised into five categories: the 'shared ideal', feeling good at the job, making a difference, experience/exposure to hospice work and the importance of role models. The shared ideal formed the core category, which explained how hospice nurses feel a sense of 'fit' with their work. CONCLUSION: The feeling of a nurse feeling well-suited to the work and that there the work was a good 'fit' for them was identified as a core element to nurses' feelings of preparedness to provide end-of-life care.

Source: PubMed

How do hospice nurses prepare to give end-of-life care? A grounded theory study of nurses in one UK hospice

Authors: Griffith, S. and Gelling, L.

Journal: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PALLIATIVE NURSING

Volume: 27

Issue: 7

Pages: 334-350

ISSN: 1357-6321

DOI: 10.12968/ijpn.2021.27.7.334

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

How do hospice nurses prepare to give end-of-life care? A grounded theory study of nurses in one UK hospice.

Authors: Griffith, S. and Gelling, L.

Journal: International journal of palliative nursing

Volume: 27

Issue: 7

Pages: 334-350

eISSN: 2052-286X

ISSN: 1357-6321

DOI: 10.12968/ijpn.2021.27.7.334

Abstract:

Background

Literature for preparing hospice nurses to deliver end-of-life care is sparse.

Aim

To investigate how nurses in one UK hospice prepared to deliver end-of-life care in their role.

Methods

A classic grounded theory approach was used to investigate the experiences of 22 registered nurses in one UK hospice, to discover how they prepared for their role. A total of 17 individual interviews and one focus group were conducted. Constant comparison of data and member checking were performed to establish validity.

Findings

Findings were synthesised into five categories: the 'shared ideal', feeling good at the job, making a difference, experience/exposure to hospice work and the importance of role models. The shared ideal formed the core category, which explained how hospice nurses feel a sense of 'fit' with their work.

Conclusion

The feeling of a nurse feeling well-suited to the work and that there the work was a good 'fit' for them was identified as a core element to nurses' feelings of preparedness to provide end-of-life care.

Source: Europe PubMed Central