The anthropogenic consequences of energy consumption in the presence of uncertainties and complexities: evidence from World Bank income clusters

Authors: Adedoyin, F.F., Satrovic, E. and Kehinde, M.N.

Journal: Environmental Science and Pollution Research

Volume: 29

Issue: 16

Pages: 23264-23279

eISSN: 1614-7499

ISSN: 0944-1344

DOI: 10.1007/s11356-021-17476-5

Abstract:

In environmental management, many studies have examined the energy consumption-emission nexus in detail. However, for the first time in the literature, this study considers how the Economic Complexity Index (ECI) and economic policy uncertainty (EPU) moderate the contribution of energy consumption to emissions for the four World Bank Income clusters. The system generalised methods of moments are applied to data for 109 countries from 1996 to 2016. Based on the main model (grouped clusters) estimations, the result revealed the existence of the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis. Also, an increase in air transport and consumption of energy releases more carbon emissions to the climate. Interestingly, ECI decreases carbon emission significantly while EPU does not have a significant impact. Moreover, the study revealed that ECI moderated the impact of other variables on emission, but EPU is not a significant moderator. Furthermore, a comparative analysis among the four incomes suggests that the EKC hypothesis holds only in the high-income clusters; ECI is a significant predictor of carbon emission in the four clusters, but it only decreases the emission in high-income clusters. This corroborates the debate on climate change and the productive capacity of high-income countries. Given the foregoing, several policy measures were recommended.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36241/

Source: Scopus

The anthropogenic consequences of energy consumption in the presence of uncertainties and complexities: evidence from World Bank income clusters.

Authors: Adedoyin, F.F., Satrovic, E. and Kehinde, M.N.

Journal: Environ Sci Pollut Res Int

Volume: 29

Issue: 16

Pages: 23264-23279

eISSN: 1614-7499

DOI: 10.1007/s11356-021-17476-5

Abstract:

In environmental management, many studies have examined the energy consumption-emission nexus in detail. However, for the first time in the literature, this study considers how the Economic Complexity Index (ECI) and economic policy uncertainty (EPU) moderate the contribution of energy consumption to emissions for the four World Bank Income clusters. The system generalised methods of moments are applied to data for 109 countries from 1996 to 2016. Based on the main model (grouped clusters) estimations, the result revealed the existence of the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis. Also, an increase in air transport and consumption of energy releases more carbon emissions to the climate. Interestingly, ECI decreases carbon emission significantly while EPU does not have a significant impact. Moreover, the study revealed that ECI moderated the impact of other variables on emission, but EPU is not a significant moderator. Furthermore, a comparative analysis among the four incomes suggests that the EKC hypothesis holds only in the high-income clusters; ECI is a significant predictor of carbon emission in the four clusters, but it only decreases the emission in high-income clusters. This corroborates the debate on climate change and the productive capacity of high-income countries. Given the foregoing, several policy measures were recommended.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36241/

Source: PubMed

The anthropogenic consequences of energy consumption in the presence of uncertainties and complexities: evidence from World Bank income clusters

Authors: Adedoyin, F.F., Satrovic, E. and Kehinde, M.N.

Journal: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH

Volume: 29

Issue: 16

Pages: 23264-23279

eISSN: 1614-7499

ISSN: 0944-1344

DOI: 10.1007/s11356-021-17476-5

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36241/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

The Anthropogenic Consequences of Energy consumption in the presence of Uncertainties and Complexities: Evidence from World Bank Income Clusters

Authors: Adedoyin, F., Satrovic, E. and Kehinde, M.

Journal: Environmental Science and Pollution Research

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISSN: 0944-1344

Abstract:

In environmental management, many studies have examined the energy consumption-emissions nexus in detail. However, for the first time in the literature, this study considers how the economic complexity index (ECI) and economic policy uncertainty (EPU) moderate the contribution of energy consumption to emissions for the four World Bank Income clusters. The system generalised methods of moments are applied to data for 109 countries from 1996 to 2016. Based on the main model (grouped clusters) estimations, the result revealed the existence of the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis. Also, an increase in air transport and consumption of energy releases more carbon emissions to the climate. Interestingly, ECI decreases carbon emission significantly while EPU does not have a significant impact. Moreover, the study revealed that ECI moderated the impact of other variables on emission, but EPU is not a significant moderator. Furthermore, a comparative analysis among the four incomes suggests that the EKC hypothesis holds only in the high-income clusters, ECI is a significant predictor of carbon emission in the four clusters, but it only decreases the emission in high-income clusters. This corroborates the debate on climate change and the productive capacity of high-income countries. Given the foregoing, several policy measures were recommended.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36241/

Source: Manual

The anthropogenic consequences of energy consumption in the presence of uncertainties and complexities: evidence from World Bank income clusters.

Authors: Adedoyin, F.F., Satrovic, E. and Kehinde, M.N.

Journal: Environmental science and pollution research international

Volume: 29

Issue: 16

Pages: 23264-23279

eISSN: 1614-7499

ISSN: 0944-1344

DOI: 10.1007/s11356-021-17476-5

Abstract:

In environmental management, many studies have examined the energy consumption-emission nexus in detail. However, for the first time in the literature, this study considers how the Economic Complexity Index (ECI) and economic policy uncertainty (EPU) moderate the contribution of energy consumption to emissions for the four World Bank Income clusters. The system generalised methods of moments are applied to data for 109 countries from 1996 to 2016. Based on the main model (grouped clusters) estimations, the result revealed the existence of the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis. Also, an increase in air transport and consumption of energy releases more carbon emissions to the climate. Interestingly, ECI decreases carbon emission significantly while EPU does not have a significant impact. Moreover, the study revealed that ECI moderated the impact of other variables on emission, but EPU is not a significant moderator. Furthermore, a comparative analysis among the four incomes suggests that the EKC hypothesis holds only in the high-income clusters; ECI is a significant predictor of carbon emission in the four clusters, but it only decreases the emission in high-income clusters. This corroborates the debate on climate change and the productive capacity of high-income countries. Given the foregoing, several policy measures were recommended.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36241/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

The Anthropogenic Consequences of Energy consumption in the presence of Uncertainties and Complexities: Evidence from World Bank Income Clusters

Authors: Adedoyin, F., Satrovic, E. and Kehinde, M.

Journal: Environmental Science and Pollution Research

Volume: 29

Pages: 23264-23279

ISSN: 0944-1344

Abstract:

In environmental management, many studies have examined the energy consumption-emissions nexus in detail. However, for the first time in the literature, this study considers how the economic complexity index (ECI) and economic policy uncertainty (EPU) moderate the contribution of energy consumption to emissions for the four World Bank Income clusters. The system generalised methods of moments are applied to data for 109 countries from 1996 to 2016. Based on the main model (grouped clusters) estimations, the result revealed the existence of the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis. Also, an increase in air transport and consumption of energy releases more carbon emissions to the climate. Interestingly, ECI decreases carbon emission significantly while EPU does not have a significant impact. Moreover, the study revealed that ECI moderated the impact of other variables on emission, but EPU is not a significant moderator. Furthermore, a comparative analysis among the four incomes suggests that the EKC hypothesis holds only in the high-income clusters, ECI is a significant predictor of carbon emission in the four clusters, but it only decreases the emission in high-income clusters. This corroborates the debate on climate change and the productive capacity of high-income countries. Given the foregoing, several policy measures were recommended.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36241/

Source: BURO EPrints