Exploring pain characteristics in nulliparous women; A precursor to developing support for women in the latent phase of labour

Authors: Clark, C.J., Kalanaviciute, G., Bartholomew, V., Cheyne, H. and Hundley, V.A.

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 104

ISSN: 0266-6138

DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2021.103174

Abstract:

Background: Admission to hospital in the latent phase of labour is associated with a cascade of unnecessary intervention. Women who seek early hospital admission may have heightened fear and anxiety in relation to pain routed in their pre-pregnancy experiences. Objective: To determine the prevalence of pain catastrophising in a healthy non-pregnant population and explore previous pain experiences and fear of childbirth as characteristics that might predict pain catastrophising. Design: Prospective observational study across two higher education institutions in Scotland and England using a semi-structured survey administered through Bristol Online Surveys. Four validated questionnaires were used to identify the prevalence of pain catastrophising and fear of childbirth in nulliparous women of reproductive age. Results: The survey was completed by 122 women undertaking an undergraduate degree and aged between 18 and 23 years. A high prevalence of pain catastrophising was found: a cut-off score of 20 and above = 47.5% (58/122 participants), a cut-off score of 30 and above = 21.3% (26/122). Fear of pain (β = 0.14, t = 4.21, p <0.001) and pain-related anxiety (β = 0.40, t = 11.39, p <0.001) were significant predictors of pain catastrophisation. However, there was no correlation between fear of childbirth and pain catastrophisation. Conclusions and implications for practice: It is reasonable to hypothesise that the pain catastrophising scale may be a good tool to predict those women likely to require additional support in the latent phase of labour; however further work is needed to explore this with a group of pregnant women.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36245/

Source: Scopus

Exploring pain characteristics in nulliparous women; A precursor to developing support for women in the latent phase of labour.

Authors: Clark, C.J., Kalanaviciute, G., Bartholomew, V., Cheyne, H. and Hundley, V.A.

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 104

Pages: 103174

eISSN: 1532-3099

DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2021.103174

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Admission to hospital in the latent phase of labour is associated with a cascade of unnecessary intervention. Women who seek early hospital admission may have heightened fear and anxiety in relation to pain routed in their pre-pregnancy experiences. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of pain catastrophising in a healthy non-pregnant population and explore previous pain experiences and fear of childbirth as characteristics that might predict pain catastrophising. DESIGN: Prospective observational study across two higher education institutions in Scotland and England using a semi-structured survey administered through Bristol Online Surveys. Four validated questionnaires were used to identify the prevalence of pain catastrophising and fear of childbirth in nulliparous women of reproductive age. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 122 women undertaking an undergraduate degree and aged between 18 and 23 years. A high prevalence of pain catastrophising was found: a cut-off score of 20 and above = 47.5% (58/122 participants), a cut-off score of 30 and above = 21.3% (26/122). Fear of pain (β = 0.14, t = 4.21, p <0 .001) and pain-related anxiety (β = 0.40, t = 11.39, p <0 .001) were significant predictors of pain catastrophisation. However, there was no correlation between fear of childbirth and pain catastrophisation. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: It is reasonable to hypothesise that the pain catastrophising scale may be a good tool to predict those women likely to require additional support in the latent phase of labour; however further work is needed to explore this with a group of pregnant women.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36245/

Source: PubMed

Exploring pain characteristics in nulliparous women; A precursor to developing support for women in the latent phase of labour

Authors: Clark, C.J., Kalanaviciuteb, G., Bartholomewc, V., Cheyne, H. and Hundleye, V.A.

Journal: MIDWIFERY

Volume: 104

eISSN: 1532-3099

ISSN: 0266-6138

DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2021.103174

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36245/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Exploring pain characteristics in nulliparous women; A precursor to developing support for women in the latent phase of labour.

Authors: Clark, C.J., Kalanaviciute, G., Bartholomew, V., Cheyne, H. and Hundley, V.A.

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 104

Pages: 103174

eISSN: 1532-3099

ISSN: 0266-6138

DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2021.103174

Abstract:

Background

Admission to hospital in the latent phase of labour is associated with a cascade of unnecessary intervention. Women who seek early hospital admission may have heightened fear and anxiety in relation to pain routed in their pre-pregnancy experiences.

Objective

To determine the prevalence of pain catastrophising in a healthy non-pregnant population and explore previous pain experiences and fear of childbirth as characteristics that might predict pain catastrophising.

Design

Prospective observational study across two higher education institutions in Scotland and England using a semi-structured survey administered through Bristol Online Surveys. Four validated questionnaires were used to identify the prevalence of pain catastrophising and fear of childbirth in nulliparous women of reproductive age.

Results

The survey was completed by 122 women undertaking an undergraduate degree and aged between 18 and 23 years. A high prevalence of pain catastrophising was found: a cut-off score of 20 and above = 47.5% (58/122 participants), a cut-off score of 30 and above = 21.3% (26/122). Fear of pain (β = 0.14, t = 4.21, p <0 .001) and pain-related anxiety (β = 0.40, t = 11.39, p <0 .001) were significant predictors of pain catastrophisation. However, there was no correlation between fear of childbirth and pain catastrophisation.

Conclusions and implications for practice

It is reasonable to hypothesise that the pain catastrophising scale may be a good tool to predict those women likely to require additional support in the latent phase of labour; however further work is needed to explore this with a group of pregnant women.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36245/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Exploring pain characteristics in nulliparous women; A precursor to developing support for women in the latent phase of labour.

Authors: Clark, C.J., Kalanaviciute, G., Bartholomew, V., Cheyne, H. and Hundley, V.A.

Journal: Midwifery

Volume: 104

Issue: January

ISSN: 0266-6138

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Admission to hospital in the latent phase of labour is associated with a cascade of unnecessary intervention. Women who seek early hospital admission may have heightened fear and anxiety in relation to pain routed in their pre-pregnancy experiences. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of pain catastrophising in a healthy non-pregnant population and explore previous pain experiences and fear of childbirth as characteristics that might predict pain catastrophising. DESIGN: Prospective observational study across two higher education institutions in Scotland and England using a semi-structured survey administered through Bristol Online Surveys. Four validated questionnaires were used to identify the prevalence of pain catastrophising and fear of childbirth in nulliparous women of reproductive age. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 122 women undertaking an undergraduate degree and aged between 18 and 23 years. A high prevalence of pain catastrophising was found: a cut-off score of 20 and above = 47.5% (58/122 participants), a cut-off score of 30 and above = 21.3% (26/122). Fear of pain (β = 0.14, t = 4.21, p <0 .001) and pain-related anxiety (β = 0.40, t = 11.39, p <0 .001) were significant predictors of pain catastrophisation. However, there was no correlation between fear of childbirth and pain catastrophisation. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: It is reasonable to hypothesise that the pain catastrophising scale may be a good tool to predict those women likely to require additional support in the latent phase of labour; however further work is needed to explore this with a group of pregnant women.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36245/

Source: BURO EPrints