Does palliative care education lead to a change in the attitudes and beliefs of pre-registration Physiotherapy students about palliative care: a literature review

Authors: Cabrini-Back, D. and Clark, C.

Journal: Physical Therapy Reviews

Volume: 27

Issue: 1

Pages: 51-59

eISSN: 1743-288X

ISSN: 1083-3196

DOI: 10.1080/10833196.2021.2000277

Abstract:

Background: Worldwide, over 61 million people suffer from symptoms caused by conditions which could be helped by Palliative Care. Physiotherapy is increasingly utilised as part of the multi-disciplinary team in providing Palliative Care, but this is not widely accepted by physiotherapists whose attitudes and beliefs towards it may be framed by the absence of the topic in their undergraduate education. Objectives: To evaluate the literature relating to the effect of Palliative Care education interventions on the attitudes and beliefs of Physiotherapy undergraduate students. Methods: A structured search on Academic Search Ultimate, MEDLINE Complete, CINAHL Complete, APA PsycInfo, Education Source, Communication Source, SPORTDiscus with Full Text, Business Source Ultimate, SocINDEX with Full Text, and Regional Business News was conducted in October 2020. Articles were limited to peer-reviewed journals published in English and involving an educational intervention delivered to pre-qualification Physiotherapy students. Results: Four papers were included which all measured change in attitudes and beliefs. Three papers showed a significant positive change in students’ attitudes and beliefs towards PC, and one showing a positive but non-significant change. There was no consensus on the ideal curriculum content, delivery method or time. Conclusion: PC content within the curriculum is still in its formative stages within Physiotherapy education. While there is currently no consensus on the ideal method and format of how it should be delivered, there is some evidence to suggest that it can have a positive impact on Physiotherapy students’ attitudes and beliefs towards PC.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36469/

Source: Scopus

Does palliative care education lead to a change in the attitudes and beliefs of pre-registration Physiotherapy students about palliative care: a literature review

Authors: Cabrini-Back, D. and Clark, C.

Journal: PHYSICAL THERAPY REVIEWS

Volume: 27

Issue: 1

Pages: 51-59

eISSN: 1743-288X

ISSN: 1083-3196

DOI: 10.1080/10833196.2021.2000277

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36469/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Does palliative care education lead to a change in the attitudes and beliefs of pre-registration Physiotherapy students about palliative care: a literature review

Authors: Cabrini-Back, D. and Clark, C.J.

Journal: Physical Therapy Reviews

Volume: 27

Issue: 1

Pages: 51-59

ISSN: 1083-3196

Abstract:

Background: Worldwide, over 61 million people suffer from symptoms caused by conditions which could be helped by Palliative Care. Physiotherapy is increasingly utilised as part of the multi-disciplinary team in providing Palliative Care, but this is not widely accepted by physiotherapists whose attitudes and beliefs towards it may be framed by the absence of the topic in their undergraduate education. Objectives: To evaluate the literature relating to the effect of Palliative Care education interventions on the attitudes and beliefs of Physiotherapy undergraduate students. Methods: A structured search on Academic Search Ultimate, MEDLINE Complete, CINAHL Complete, APA PsycInfo, Education Source, Communication Source, SPORTDiscus with Full Text, Business Source Ultimate, SocINDEX with Full Text, and Regional Business News was conducted in October 2020. Articles were limited to peer-reviewed journals published in English and involving an educational intervention delivered to pre-qualification Physiotherapy students. Results: Four papers were included which all measured change in attitudes and beliefs. Three papers showed a significant positive change in students’ attitudes and beliefs towards PC, and one showing a positive but non-significant change. There was no consensus on the ideal curriculum content, delivery method or time. Conclusion: PC content within the curriculum is still in its formative stages within Physiotherapy education. While there is currently no consensus on the ideal method and format of how it should be delivered, there is some evidence to suggest that it can have a positive impact on Physiotherapy students’ attitudes and beliefs towards PC.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36469/

Source: BURO EPrints