Education, social identity and self-employment over time: evidence from a developing country

Authors: Tamvada, J.P., Shrivastava, M. and Mishra, T.K.

Journal: Small Business Economics

eISSN: 1573-0913

ISSN: 0921-898X

DOI: 10.1007/s11187-021-00583-5

Abstract:

While the extant literature suggests that an individual’s occupational choice depends on the level of economic development, little is known about how the dynamics of education and social identity impact self-employment choice over time in a developing country setting. The pseudo-panel regression results presented here suggest that higher education decreases the likelihood of individuals’ choice of self-employment over time in India, but increases it in most developed cohorts. Such transitional dynamics are more prominent amongst individuals who belong to historically determined backward classes. Furthermore, the results suggest sectoral differences in self-employment choice—individuals with higher education and wealth have a greater likelihood of transiting into self-employment over time in agriculture while similar individuals in non-agriculture exit self-employment. In both sectors, however, education moderates the impact of social identity on self-employment choice. The paper underscores the need for policy shifts towards entrepreneurship along the path of economic development.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36449/

Source: Scopus

Education, social identity and self-employment over time: evidence from a developing country

Authors: Tamvada, J.P., Shrivastava, M. and Mishra, T.K.

Journal: SMALL BUSINESS ECONOMICS

eISSN: 1573-0913

ISSN: 0921-898X

DOI: 10.1007/s11187-021-00583-5

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36449/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Education, Social Identity and Self-employment over Time: Evidence from a Developing Country

Authors: Tamvada, J.P., Shrivastava, M. and Tapas, M.

Journal: Small Business Economics: an international journal

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISSN: 0921-898X

Abstract:

While the extant literature suggests that an individual’s occupational choice depends on the level of economic development, little is known about how the dynamics of education and social identity impact self-employment choice over time in a developing country setting. The pseudo panel regression results presented here suggest that higher education decreases the likelihood of individuals’ choice of self-employment over time in India, but increases it in most developed cohorts. Such transitional dynamics are more prominent among individuals who belong to historically determined backward classes. Furthermore, the results suggest sectoral differences in self-employment choice – individuals with higher education and wealth have a greater likelihood of transiting into self-employment over time in agriculture while similar individuals in non-agriculture exit self-employment. In both sectors, however, education moderates the impact of social identity on self-employment choice. The paper underscores the need for policy shifts towards entrepreneurship along the path of economic development.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36449/

https://www.springer.com/journal/11187

Source: Manual

Education, Social Identity and Self-employment over Time: Evidence from a Developing Country

Authors: Tamvada, J.P., Shrivastava, M. and Tapas, M.

Journal: Small Business Economics: an international journal

ISSN: 0921-898X

Abstract:

While the extant literature suggests that an individual’s occupational choice depends on the level of economic development, little is known about how the dynamics of education and social identity impact self-employment choice over time in a developing country setting. The pseudo panel regression results presented here suggest that higher education decreases the likelihood of individuals’ choice of self-employment over time in India, but increases it in most developed cohorts. Such transitional dynamics are more prominent among individuals who belong to historically determined backward classes. Furthermore, the results suggest sectoral differences in self-employment choice – individuals with higher education and wealth have a greater likelihood of transiting into self-employment over time in agriculture while similar individuals in non-agriculture exit self-employment. In both sectors, however, education moderates the impact of social identity on self-employment choice. The paper underscores the need for policy shifts towards entrepreneurship along the path of economic development.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36449/

https://www.springer.com/journal/11187

Source: BURO EPrints