Early Laser for Burn Scars (ELABS): protocol for a multi-centre randomised, controlled trial of both the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the treatment of hypertrophic burn scars with Pulsed Dye Laser and standard care compared to standard care alone [version 1; peer review: 2 approved].

Authors: Brewin, M., Docherty, S., Heaslip, V., Breheny, K., Pleat, J., Rhodes, S., van Zuijlen, P.P.M. and Shah, M.

Journal: NIHR Open Res

Volume: 2

Pages: 1

eISSN: 2633-4402

DOI: 10.3310/nihropenres.13234.1

Abstract:

This paper outlines the protocol for a study that is being carried out at multiple centres across the UK in the next three years. It is a Research for Patient Benefit (RfPB) study funded by the National Institute for Healthcare Research (NIHR). The aim is to assess the effectiveness of treating hypertrophic burns scars with pulsed dye laser (PDL) at an early stage of scar formation. The objective is to improve Quality of Life for the patient by improving both the appearance and quality of burn scarring, as well as reducing its psychological impact. This is a parallel-arm randomised, controlled trial to compare PDL and standard care against standard care alone. The difference is measured between baseline and six-month follow-up. Recruits are within three months of healing from a burn injury; with wounds showing a defined potential for hypertrophic scarring. A total of 120 patients are recruited in a multi-centre study; with randomisation in a 1:1 allocation to each arm. The treatment arm receives 3 PDL treatments at six-week intervals in addition to standard care, whereas the control arm receives standard care alone. The primary outcome is the patient-rated part of the Patient and Observer Scar Scale (POSAS). Psychological and psycho-social impact is evaluated using the CARe burn scale (UWE, Bristol) and Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALY) is determined using the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12). The study evaluates both the cost-effectiveness through an economic analysis and the patient-reported experience of the treatment by phone interviews.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36863/

Source: PubMed

Early Laser for Burn Scars (ELABS): protocol for a multi-centre randomised, controlled trial of both the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the treatment of hypertrophic burn scars with Pulsed Dye Laser and standard care compared to standard care alone [version 1; peer review: 2 approved].

Authors: Brewin, M., Docherty, S., Heaslip, V., Breheny, K., Pleat, J., Rhodes, S., van Zuijlen, P.P.M. and Shah, M.

Journal: NIHR Open Res

Volume: 2

Pages: 1

eISSN: 2633-4402

DOI: 10.3310/nihropenres.13234.1

Abstract:

This paper outlines the protocol for a study that is being carried out at multiple centres across the UK in the next three years. It is a Research for Patient Benefit (RfPB) study funded by the National Institute for Healthcare Research (NIHR). The aim is to assess the effectiveness of treating hypertrophic burns scars with pulsed dye laser (PDL) at an early stage of scar formation. The objective is to improve Quality of Life for the patient by improving both the appearance and quality of burn scarring, as well as reducing its psychological impact. This is a parallel-arm randomised, controlled trial to compare PDL and standard care against standard care alone. The difference is measured between baseline and six-month follow-up. Recruits are within three months of healing from a burn injury; with wounds showing a defined potential for hypertrophic scarring. A total of 120 patients are recruited in a multi-centre study; with randomisation in a 1:1 allocation to each arm. The treatment arm receives 3 PDL treatments at six-week intervals in addition to standard care, whereas the control arm receives standard care alone. The primary outcome is the patient-rated part of the Patient and Observer Scar Scale (POSAS). Psychological and psycho-social impact is evaluated using the CARe burn scale (UWE, Bristol) and Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALY) is determined using the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12). The study evaluates both the cost-effectiveness through an economic analysis and the patient-reported experience of the treatment by phone interviews.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36863/

Source: Manual

Early Laser for Burn Scars (ELABS): protocol for a multi-centre randomised, controlled trial of both the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the treatment of hypertrophic burn scars with Pulsed Dye Laser and standard care compared to standard care alone [version 1; peer review: 2 approved].

Authors: Brewin, M., Docherty, S., Heaslip, V., Breheny, K., Pleat, J., Rhodes, S., van Zuijlen, P.P.M. and Shah, M.

Journal: NIHR open research

Volume: 2

Pages: 1

eISSN: 2633-4402

DOI: 10.3310/nihropenres.13234.1

Abstract:

This paper outlines the protocol for a study that is being carried out at multiple centres across the UK in the next three years. It is a Research for Patient Benefit (RfPB) study funded by the National Institute for Healthcare Research (NIHR). The aim is to assess the effectiveness of treating hypertrophic burns scars with pulsed dye laser (PDL) at an early stage of scar formation. The objective is to improve Quality of Life for the patient by improving both the appearance and quality of burn scarring, as well as reducing its psychological impact. This is a parallel-arm randomised, controlled trial to compare PDL and standard care against standard care alone. The difference is measured between baseline and six-month follow-up. Recruits are within three months of healing from a burn injury; with wounds showing a defined potential for hypertrophic scarring. A total of 120 patients are recruited in a multi-centre study; with randomisation in a 1:1 allocation to each arm. The treatment arm receives 3 PDL treatments at six-week intervals in addition to standard care, whereas the control arm receives standard care alone. The primary outcome is the patient-rated part of the Patient and Observer Scar Scale (POSAS). Psychological and psycho-social impact is evaluated using the CARe burn scale (UWE, Bristol) and Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALY) is determined using the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12). The study evaluates both the cost-effectiveness through an economic analysis and the patient-reported experience of the treatment by phone interviews.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36863/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Early Laser for Burn Scars (ELABS): protocol for a multi-centre randomised, controlled trial of both the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the treatment of hypertrophic burn scars with Pulsed Dye Laser and standard care compared to standard care alone [version 1; peer review: 2 approved].

Authors: Brewin, M., Docherty, S., Heaslip, V., Breheny, K., Pleat, J., Rhodes, S., van Zuijlen, P.P.M. and Shah, M.

Journal: NIHR Open Research

Volume: 2

ISSN: 2633-4402

Abstract:

This paper outlines the protocol for a study that is being carried out at multiple centres across the UK in the next three years. It is a Research for Patient Benefit (RfPB) study funded by the National Institute for Healthcare Research (NIHR). The aim is to assess the effectiveness of treating hypertrophic burns scars with pulsed dye laser (PDL) at an early stage of scar formation. The objective is to improve Quality of Life for the patient by improving both the appearance and quality of burn scarring, as well as reducing its psychological impact. This is a parallel-arm randomised, controlled trial to compare PDL and standard care against standard care alone. The difference is measured between baseline and six-month follow-up. Recruits are within three months of healing from a burn injury; with wounds showing a defined potential for hypertrophic scarring. A total of 120 patients are recruited in a multi-centre study; with randomisation in a 1:1 allocation to each arm. The treatment arm receives 3 PDL treatments at six-week intervals in addition to standard care, whereas the control arm receives standard care alone. The primary outcome is the patient-rated part of the Patient and Observer Scar Scale (POSAS). Psychological and psycho-social impact is evaluated using the CARe burn scale (UWE, Bristol) and Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALY) is determined using the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12). The study evaluates both the cost-effectiveness through an economic analysis and the patient-reported experience of the treatment by phone interviews.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36863/

Source: BURO EPrints