In vivo through-range passive stiffness of the lumbar spine: a meta-analysis of measurements and methods

Authors: Watt, A.A., Callaway, A.J. and Williams, J.M.

Journal: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing

Volume: 60

Issue: 8

Pages: 2133-2157

eISSN: 1741-0444

ISSN: 0140-0118

DOI: 10.1007/s11517-022-02609-w

Abstract:

Passive spinal stiffness is an important property thought to play a significant role in controlling spinal position and movement. Measuring through-range passive stiffness in vivo is challenging with several methods offered in the literature. Currently, no synthesis of values or methods exists to which to compare literature to. This study aims to provide a contemporary review and quantitative synthesis of the through-range in vivo passive lumbar spinal stiffness values for each of the cardinal planes of movement. A structured systematic search, following PRISMA guidelines, of 28 electronic databases was conducted in 2022. Articles were restricted to peer-reviewed English language studies investigating in vivo through-range passive stiffness of the lumbar spine. Thirteen studies were included, ten relating to flexion/extension, four to lateral bending and five to axial rotation. Average stiffness values, as weighted means and confidence intervals, for each of the four sections of the moment-movement curves were synthesised for all planes of movement. Lateral bending was found to be the comparatively stiffest movement followed by flexion and then axial rotation. Future research should focus on the validity and reliability of measurement techniques. Axial rotation would also benefit from further study of its latter stages of range. Graphical abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.].

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37146/

Source: Scopus

In vivo through-range passive stiffness of the lumbar spine: a meta-analysis of measurements and methods.

Authors: Watt, A.A., Callaway, A.J. and Williams, J.M.

Journal: Med Biol Eng Comput

Volume: 60

Issue: 8

Pages: 2133-2157

eISSN: 1741-0444

DOI: 10.1007/s11517-022-02609-w

Abstract:

Passive spinal stiffness is an important property thought to play a significant role in controlling spinal position and movement. Measuring through-range passive stiffness in vivo is challenging with several methods offered in the literature. Currently, no synthesis of values or methods exists to which to compare literature to. This study aims to provide a contemporary review and quantitative synthesis of the through-range in vivo passive lumbar spinal stiffness values for each of the cardinal planes of movement. A structured systematic search, following PRISMA guidelines, of 28 electronic databases was conducted in 2022. Articles were restricted to peer-reviewed English language studies investigating in vivo through-range passive stiffness of the lumbar spine. Thirteen studies were included, ten relating to flexion/extension, four to lateral bending and five to axial rotation. Average stiffness values, as weighted means and confidence intervals, for each of the four sections of the moment-movement curves were synthesised for all planes of movement. Lateral bending was found to be the comparatively stiffest movement followed by flexion and then axial rotation. Future research should focus on the validity and reliability of measurement techniques. Axial rotation would also benefit from further study of its latter stages of range.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37146/

Source: PubMed

In vivo through-range passive stiffness of the lumbar spine: a meta-analysis of measurements and methods

Authors: Watt, A.A., Callaway, A.J. and Williams, J.M.

Journal: MEDICAL & BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING & COMPUTING

Volume: 60

Issue: 8

Pages: 2133-2157

eISSN: 1741-0444

ISSN: 0140-0118

DOI: 10.1007/s11517-022-02609-w

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37146/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

In vivo through range passive stiffness of the lumbar spine: a meta-analysis of measurements and methods

Authors: Watt, A., Callaway, A. and Williams, J.

Journal: Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37146/

Source: Manual

In vivo through-range passive stiffness of the lumbar spine: a meta-analysis of measurements and methods

Authors: Watt, A., Callaway, A. and Williams, J.

Journal: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing

Volume: 60

Issue: 8

Pages: 2133-2157

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISSN: 0140-0118

DOI: 10.1007/s11517-022-02609-w

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37146/

Source: Manual

In vivo through-range passive stiffness of the lumbar spine: a meta-analysis of measurements and methods.

Authors: Watt, A.A., Callaway, A.J. and Williams, J.M.

Journal: Medical & biological engineering & computing

Volume: 60

Issue: 8

Pages: 2133-2157

eISSN: 1741-0444

ISSN: 0140-0118

DOI: 10.1007/s11517-022-02609-w

Abstract:

Passive spinal stiffness is an important property thought to play a significant role in controlling spinal position and movement. Measuring through-range passive stiffness in vivo is challenging with several methods offered in the literature. Currently, no synthesis of values or methods exists to which to compare literature to. This study aims to provide a contemporary review and quantitative synthesis of the through-range in vivo passive lumbar spinal stiffness values for each of the cardinal planes of movement. A structured systematic search, following PRISMA guidelines, of 28 electronic databases was conducted in 2022. Articles were restricted to peer-reviewed English language studies investigating in vivo through-range passive stiffness of the lumbar spine. Thirteen studies were included, ten relating to flexion/extension, four to lateral bending and five to axial rotation. Average stiffness values, as weighted means and confidence intervals, for each of the four sections of the moment-movement curves were synthesised for all planes of movement. Lateral bending was found to be the comparatively stiffest movement followed by flexion and then axial rotation. Future research should focus on the validity and reliability of measurement techniques. Axial rotation would also benefit from further study of its latter stages of range.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37146/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

In vivo through range passive stiffness of the lumbar spine: a meta-analysis of measurements and methods

Authors: Watt, A., Callaway, A. and Williams, J.

Journal: Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing

Volume: 60

Pages: 2133-2157

ISSN: 0140-0118

Abstract:

Passive spinal stiffness is an important property thought to play a significant role in controlling spinal position and movement. Measuring through-range passive stiffness in vivo is challenging with several methods offered in the literature. Currently, no synthesis of values or methods exists to which to compare literature to. This study aims to provide a contemporary review and quantitative synthesis of the through-range in vivo passive lumbar spinal stiffness values for each of the cardinal planes of movement. A structured systematic search, following PRISMA guidelines, of 28 electronic databases was conducted in 2022. Articles were restricted to peer-reviewed English language studies investigating in vivo through-range passive stiffness of the lumbar spine. Thirteen studies were included, ten relating to flexion/extension, four to lateral bending and five to axial rotation. Average stiffness values, as weighted means and confidence intervals, for each of the four sections of the moment-movement curves were synthesised for all planes of movement. Lateral bending was found to be the comparatively stiffest movement followed by flexion and then axial rotation. Future research should focus on the validity and reliability of measurement techniques. Axial rotation would also benefit from further study of its latter stages of range.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37146/

Source: BURO EPrints